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THE STAGE COACH 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE STAGE COACH STAFF 




VOLUME XXVIII 
1926 



YEAR BOOK OF THE STUDENTS 

SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



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Hail Saint Mary % s 

Adapted from Margaret Mason Toung, 1899 

TX a grove of stately oak trees, 
-*- Where tlic sunjight lies, 
Stands Saint Mary's true and noble 
'Neath the Southern skies. 

Far and wide, oil sound her praises. 

Chorus full and free, 
Hail, Saint Mary's Alma Mater, 

Hail, all hail to thee ! 

Well we love the little chapel, 

Ever hold it dear; 
Hear the echoes id' the music, 

Rising soft and clear. 

Far and wide, etc. 

There the ivy and the roses 

Climb the old stone wall, 
There the sweet, enticing bird notes 

Sound their magic call. 

Far and wide, etc. 

And the bonds of friendship strengthen. 

As her beauties charm; 
We grow close to Alma Mater, 

Trust her guiding arm. 

Far and wide, etc. 



m 







Foreword 



Many years ago the stage coach came to St. Mary's each year. But 
gradually the trips became fewer and fewer until soon there were none 
at all 

Last year our "Stage Coach." took up its annual journey once again, this 
time in the form of a book. The 1926 trip of the "Stage Coach" will be 
successful if it carries away with each one of us such pleasant memories 
that we will often return to our St. Mary's and see future "Stage Coaches" 
and the passengers they will carry. 






Dedication 

\ I Hi appreciate all you have done for the advance- 
ment of St. Mary's, yet honoring her traditions; 
we are encouraged by your inspiring personality; we 
strive to live up to your ideals; we admire you as a 
woman; we love you as a friend; therefore, we the 
Senior Class of ninetee.n-twenty-six, in behalf of the 
Student Body, do dedicate this the twenty-eighth year- 
book of St. Mary's 

TO YOU 

Miss Sara Clarke Turner 








Six 













ALMA MATER 
CLASSES 

m 

ORGANIZATIONS 

IY 

THRO™ WINDOW 



Eight 




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Alma Mater 

Tune: "Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms" 

QT. MARY'S! "Wherever thy daughters may be 

k -' They love thy high praises to sing, 

And to tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling; 

They may wander afar; out of reach of thy name 

Afar out of sight of thy grove. 

But the thought of Saint Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 



Beloved Saint Mary's ! How great is our debt ! 
Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well ; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 
Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 
An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow am 
Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 



lid enilure 




May the future unite all the good of the past 
With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course ! to the last 
Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 
Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove, 
Ami carry thy teachings o'er woodland and hill 
Of earnestness, wisdom and love. 




Fifteen 




Eighteen 



The Board of Trustees 

The Bishops 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire. D.D., Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junks M. Horner, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wn. Alexander Guerry, D.D Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. H. C. Darst. D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Kirkman G. Finlay, D.D Columbia, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Edwin Penick, D.D Charlotte, N. C. 

Clerical and Lay Trustees 

North Carolina 
(Until 1930) (Until 10-7) 

Mr. Graham. H. Andrews. Raleigh. Rev. M. A. Barber. Raleigh. 

Mr. Wji. H. Battle. Rocky Mount. Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh. 

Dr R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham. 

Mrs. W. D. Toy, Chapel Hill. Rev. Isaac M. Hughes, Henderson. 

East Carolina 

(Until 1930) (Until 1927) 

Rev J. B. Gibble. Wilmington. Rev. R. B. Diiane, Edenton. 

Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro. Mr. W. D. MacMillan. Jr.. Wilmington. 

Western North Carolina 

(Until 1926) Tr (Until 1930) 

Rev. J. W. Cantey Johnson, Gastonia. Rev. John H. Griffith, Asheville. 

Mr. Geo. H. Holmes, Tryon. Mr. Addison C. Mangum, Gastonia. 

South Carolina 

(Until 1926) 

Mb. T. W. Bacot, Charleston. Rev. W. S. Poyneh, Florence. 

Dr. W. M. Egleston, Hartsyille. Rev. Wm. Way, Charleston. 

Upper South Carolina 
(Until 1926) 
Mr. D. G. Ellison. Columbia. Rev. Wm. E. McCoro. Rook Hill. 

Mr. W. S. Manning, Spartanburg. Rev. T. T. Walsh, York. 

Executive Committee 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman 
Mr. Graham H. Andrews. Rev. Isaac W. Hughes 

Mr. W. A. Erwin Dr. R. H. Lewis 

Mr. Geo. C. Royall Mrs. W. T. Bickett 

Secretary and Treasurer of Executive Committee 
Mr. Charles Root, Raleigh, N. C. 

AlumiiK Officers 

Mrs. Maurice G. O'Neill, President Henderson, N. C. 

Dr. Julia Harris, Vice President Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Bennett Perry, Secretary Henderson, N. C. 

Mrs. W. A. Withers, Treasurer Raleigh, N. C. 

Nineteen 








The Rt. Rev. Joseph Bun \\t Cheshire, D.D. 



Twenty 




The Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Pekick 



Twenlu-ons 
















The Rev. Warren Wade Way 
Sixth Rector of Saint Mary's School, 191S 








Miss Catherine Albertson 
Dean of Students, 1926 






Twenty -three 







.Miss Sara Clarke Turner 
Academic Head. 192U 



ALBERT W. Tl'CKKH 

Business Manager 




Twenty-four 





Miss Kate McKimmox 

"Constant as the Northern Star, 
Of whose true, flx'd, and resting quality 
There is no fellow in the firmament." 









-Emilie McVea. 



Twenty-five 








Miss Ruth Loarixg Clark 
President of the Student Body 




The School Council 



Faculty 

Mr. Way - Chairman 

Miss Turner Secretary 



OFFICERS 

Honor Committee 

Ruth L. Clark President 

Marion Lee Secretary 



MEMBERS 



Mu. WAY 

Miss Ai.bertson 

Miss Turner 

Mr. Stone 

Mr. Tucker 

Miss Davis 

Tr.ynt.ie Swartwood 

Miss Cobb 

Miss Fenner 

Ruth L. Clark 



Marion Lee 
Joye MoCuen 
Olivia Mobley 
Ai.he Dewak 
Viroinia Evans 
Mela Royall 
Fannie Aiken 
Elizabeth Platt 
Phoebe Harding 
Elizabeth Green 







Tiventy-seven 



c 




The Faculty and Officers of Saint Mary's 
1925-1926 

Rev. Wahre.n W. Way Rector 

Miss Catherine Skton Ai.hektson Dean of students 

Miss Sara Clarke Tukner - Academic Hear! 

A. W. Tucker Secretary and Business Manager 

The Academic Department 

Rkv. Warren W. Way Bible 

A.H., Hobart College; A.M.. University of. Chicago; Rector of St. Mary's, 1918 — 

Sara Clarke Turner English 

A.B., Goucher; A.M., Columbia University 

William E. Stone History. Economies and Sociology 

AH., Harvard 

Hazel Harriet Riley Science and Mathematics 

University of Vermont, Ph.B , 1H14, A.M., 1916 

Jean Falconer Grant Science 

A.B., Sweetbriar College 

Bertha Rief French 

A.B., Vassal- College 

Lou aii Monroe Mathematics 

A.B., Wellesley College 

SUSAN Reavts Cooke English 

Ph.B., University of Chicago 

Lora E. Simuolotti Spanish and French 

Berlitz School n[ Languages, Boston 

Mabel Julia Shafcott ....Latin 

A.B., Colorado College; A.M., Columbia University 

Susan B. Thornton English 

A.B., Oxf I College; University of Cincinnati 

Catherine Herring English 

A.B., University of Texas 

Mrs. Ruth Badges Hai.i French and History 

A.B.. (Ilierlin College 

Grace Houchen Physical Education 

Harvard University Department of Physical Eduration; Peabody College 

Katherine Morris Assistant Physical Director 

SI. Mary's 1925; Teacher 192G — 
T ntu-riuM 



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Music Department 

William H. Jones, A.A.G.O., Director Piano, Organ, Voire, Theory 

A.B., Trinity College; Berlin, Germany 

Mary Elizabeth Bell Piano 

Mount Allison Conservatory of Music 

Elizabeth Craig Code Piano 

Bell Piano School ; Pupil of Caia Aarup Green, Brookfield School 

Georgeia A. Crofut Voire 

Julia B. Dickinson, John J. Bishop, New England Conservatory, Boston 

Mrs. Bessie Rave McMillan Violin 

Gustave Hagedorn 

Art Department 
Clara I. Fenner Drawing, Painting, Design 

Maryland Institute 

Expression Department 

Florence C. Davis, Director Expression, Dramatic Art 

B.O., Emerson College 

Business Department 

Lizzie H. Lee Stenography, Typewriting. Bookkeeping 

Home Economics Department 
Elizabeth Bason Domestic Science, Domestic Art 

A.B., Flora MacDonald ; Teachers College, Columbia University 

OFFICERS 1925-1926 

Rev. Warren W. Way Rector 

Miss Catherine Albertson Dean of Students 

Miss Sara Clarke Turner Academic Head 

Miss Kate McKijimon Special Supervisor 

Mrs. Nannie H. Marriott Dietitian 

Miss Florence U. Talbot Assistant Housekeeper 

Miss Annie Alexander, R.N Matron of the Infirmary 

Graduate of St. Vincent's Hospital, Norfolk, Va. 

Dr. A. W. Knox School Physician 

Dr. H. B. Haywood, Jr Associate Physician 

A. W. Tucker Secretary and Business Manager 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Miss Juliet B. Sutton secretary to the Rector 

Miss Mary Lewis Sasser Office Secretary 

Mrs. Dudley H. R. Wigg office Secretary 

Mrs. Ella Howell Weedon Librarian 



Thirty 




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Thirty-one 







Thirty-two 




:'.':■'■/■' 
1 







^SENIORS' 



n, rlu -u, r « 













Me. Wilt.iam E. Stone 
Sponsor of the Senior Class, 1020 



Thirty/our 




Miss BiarniA Ruef, Class Adviser 



Senior Class 



Ebony and Hold 

Motto: Climh tho' 



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Flower,: Blackeyed Susan 
rocks be rugged 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Marion Lee President 

Olivia Mobley Vice President 

Sarah Leinster Secretary and Treasurer 

Ann Lawrence Historian 

Ruth L. Clark = Testator 

Olivia Mobley Prophet 

Alicia Platt Poet 

SCHOOL COUNCIL MEMBERS 

Marion Lee Olivia Mobley 

Ruth L. Clark Jove McCuen 

Alice Dewar 

CLASS ROLL 

Allen Hubbard Lester Rose 

Beac-hani Jolly Lyon Sansbury 

Bullitt Jones Martin Shore 

Clark Jordan McCuen Smith 

Crudup Kitchin Miller Thornton 

Dewar Lawrence A. Mobley Towers 

Dougherty Lawrence, (Mrs.) E. B. Nicolson , Wilson 

Edmonson Lee, M. Pendleton Willis 

Harrison Lee, L. Platt Womble 

Hosnier Leinster Purrington 








Thirty-nix 







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Fur lii two 




Porty-f. 




Forty-six 




Forty-seven 




Forty-eight 




Film 




Fifty-one 




Fifty-four 




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Katherjne Hosmer 

Fort Myers, Florida 
Kapahle, HonoraMe 
1924-25-26 
Mil E. A. 



Southern Club (1); ColleRe Club (1. 2); Altai- 
Guild (1, 2); Choir (1, 2); Chorus (2); Choir 
Librarian (2); Assistant Editor of tin- Mime. (2); 
Inter.-society Debater (2). 




■ 




I'if'll-lir 




Choir (3, 4. 5); Altai Guild (4, ">): President 
at Altnr Guild (5): Choras ('J. 3, 4. 5); I)r« 
math- Chili (4, 6): North Carolina Cluh (3, 4)' 
ran-Aiihon Council (.")); Class Historian (5) 
Excommunicated member of Order of N. V. N 
tS): Second Team Volley Ball (5). 




Fifty; 




Fifty-eight 




Fifhi-fii 




Mu 



Loulsa Lee 

Freemont, N. C. 

Lively, Loquacious 

1923-24-25-26 

Sigma Lambda 




Sketch Olub (1); North Carolina Club (1, 2); 
Granddaughters Club (1, 2, a); College Club 
(1, 'A 3). 




Sixty-four 




Sixty-five 





North Carolina Chili (1, 2): Tliird Team Bas- 
ketball (1): Granddaughters Club (1, 2, 3); 
Si'itiml Team Basketball U); Kirst Team Bas- 
ketball (3); College Club <3); PanArutan 
Council (3); Vice President of the Altar Guild 
(3): Treasurer of the E. A. P, Literary Society 
(3); Secretary of the Granddaughters Club (3); 
Business Manager of the Must (3). 










I»»|WI !■»! '»' 





Ml'SETTE KlTCHIW 

Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Mirthful, Kute 

liu Day Pupil 




Seniors 



Marion Lee 

Miir inn is not only tlie beauty (if our class, 
luii she has bruins too — witness the parties and 
the minstrel she has "put over'' this year. Who 
but Marion could have guided the Seniors through 
the joys and trials of Senior Year and kept the 
warm love and friendship of each and every one 
of them? Her grace and charm have made her 
a necessary a del it inn to all Colonial Balls and 
May Days and her fun-loving, sweet disposition 
and Charming personality have made her an in- 
dispensable fa. 'lot- to both girls and faculty in 
school. 



Mrs. Elizabeth B. Lawrence 

Mrs. Lawrence is the honorary member of the 
Class of ,- 26. The Class of '26 considers that it 
is they, rather than Mrs. Lawrence, who are 
honored. For many years she has had the best 
interests of Saint Mary's at heart, and this year 
the Seniors have been fortunate in bavins her 
special interest. She is constantly thinking of and 
acting for the happiness of others and never seems 
to tire of doing good for every one. She is truly 
"energetic, benevolent, and loyal," 



Alicia Lamar Plait 

The E, A. P.'s couldn't have a better President 
than "Cuba" nor is there any girl who has more 
deserved the honor of "Chief Marshal." She has 
a wonderful talent for essay and poetry writing, 
but "Cuba" does not spend all of her time im- 
proving her knowledge. She is always ready to 
laugh at Ruth's jokes or go for a walk on the 
campus; and we have a faint recollection of having 
seen her do acrobatic stunts on the tire escape 
between "third floor" and the second floor of 
Senior Hall. 



SYLBERT PENDLETON 

"Syllyl Sylly! Come here and show me how to 
do this I" Her name doesn't show it, but she is 
our pride and joy, to say nothing of salvation, 
efficiency personified. But. don't think she's one 
of these coldblooded, "experts." Far from it, 
Indeed, she is as efficient a ringleader of devil- 
ment as she is Editor of the Stage Coach. 
Any hour of the day (or night) you can detect 
"that Pendleton child" in the midst of most any- 
thing. And whatll we do with our troubles when 
Sylly's in Manila. 



Frances Olivia Mobley 

"The Most Lovable" — No one begrudges "V V" 
this honor, for she has certainly shown us that 
it was conferred on the right person. 

The Seniors are all glad that slie decided to 
come back and graduate with us — so is "V V," 
for her future lias been partially decided this 
year. Can you imagine " V V in a white cap 
and apron waiting mi tables? Well — that's her 
ambition, any way. Sh-h-h, we expect some gal- 
lant guest will tip her with a house and lot. 



Carolyn Cleave Shore 

Another proof of Senior versatility comes to 
the front when we introduce "C-Shore." Such 
a seamstress! If she fulfills all the promises she 

lias b i forced to make to sew for Senior 

trousseaus, she will have her hands full — maybe I 
We will always remember the delicious oranges 
and alligator ('don't get frightened) uears that 
she lias been showered with in Senior Hall. 
She has been a loyal member of the class of '26, 
one we have all been glad to own. 



Sallik Leinsteh 

When you see curly headed, daintily dressed 
Siil lie stepping off down town you envy her, but 
you try to console yourself by saying : "Well, 
any one as pretty as that can't have brains." But 
she has, and uses them, as is evidenced by the 
heavy con rse she carries. She's not only pretty 
and sweet, but while you may not believe this, 
she even looks graceful while doing the "Charles- 
ton." And is she popular '. Well — -just mention 
Sallie Lei nster anywhere from Kalamazoo, to 
TimbuctOO, and watch (he boys sit up and take 
notice. 

Rt tii Loaring Clark 

"Some one practicing the scales?" No, just 
thrills of laughter heard from Senior Hall. Ruth 
must be pursued by a bear. But it's hardly 
necessary to tell about Ifulli's sense of humor, 
for we can't imagine any one whose optimistic 
and genial disposition is more pronounced. She 
is conscientious too and honorably upholds the 
responsibility of her office. She's always on I he 
••pnl under two conditions: When you need a 
friend (a mighty good time to have a person 
appear), and when "food" is whispered (the time 
WO all assemble). 



Mary Rouena Nicolson 

"Where's Mary Nic? I've worked on the 
problem for an hour" (apt to be heard from 
almost any distressed voice) ; and no matter who 
it is, Mary Nic is always ready to come to the 
rescue. Woe be unto a class with no "math 
shark" like ours. In spite of her dislike for 
certain (k)niglll errants, who persist in turning 
on lights and leaving doors open, we all think of 
Mary Nic as a good friend, 



Margaret Wilson 

The Seniors found an unexpected pleasure wait- 
ing to "add spice lo life" when they returned to 
school in the fall and found "Mopsa." one of our 
three new Seniors. But she was not consider 

"new" very long, for she entered whole-heartedly 



iolo at 



of the activities of the class. 



"Mopsa" once had hopes of being an actress or 
an author, but, alas! — in spite of Miss Turner's 
excellent teaching in English E and Englisil N, 
as well as her opinions on the subject, we fear 




doomed io be 



wail rcss. 




Louise Terrell Allen 

Louise holds an S. M. S. and is there any 
wonder? "When the good old Sigmas fall in line" 
she is always in the lead, and the Sigmas are 
proud of their president. When we turn to 
statistics we see that she is our "Most Stylish ;" 
and, if you don't believe Louise is a graceful 
dancer, just gaze through the parlor window sonic 
evening. Besides this, Louise has carried as 
many as eight courses at one time (not so easy) ; 
and has made friends throughout the entire 
school. 



Juliettk H. Smith 

"Now, Miss Smith, give us an example of this 
in Scotland Neck" (time any one of Mr. Stone s 
Classes). The fact that Juliette is from the mucb- 
talked-of Scotland Neck, would make her 
prominent. We think we could all profit by 
Juliette's conscientiousness and her studious dis- 
position. Besides these virtues, she is always 
cheerful and accomodating and ready to offer any 
service she can. We could never have lived our 
Senior year as happily without her. and we leave 
her with the assurance that Romeo is watting. 









Katherine Lyon 

Kat Lyon — What an excellent chance for some 
puns. But we won't attempt any because we 
know Kat is clever enough to get even with us. 
When we think of her lovable and accomodating 
disposition, her ready wit. splendid dancing, and 
her exceptional dramatic ability, we don't wonder 
that she is considered our "Most Attractive." 
But the best thing about Kat is that -she doesn't 
have to depend upon being attractive. She has 
real ability — if you don't believe it just look at 
the way she's led the Sisruia Lambda's to victory. 



Irma I. Edmonson 

May we present another loyal "Sigma born 
and a Sigma bred and when she dies. . . ." 
Well, she'll then be "Sigma Spirit." The E. A. P.'s 
may thank their stars that the Sigma Lambda's 
haven't found Irma's talent for debating, for the 
results might have been disastrous! Irma has 
another admirable trait, for she reminds us of 
the cockleburr who says that if he's your friend. 
"hell stick to you until the end." 



Maky Margaret Willis 

Mary Margaret is certainly a bird! Now don't 
get excited — we mean a song bird. We don't know 
what the E. A. P.'s or the Church School Service 
League would ever have done without her voice, 
and the Seniors never would have passed English 
X without her contribution to the midnight 
Matches — no, it wasn't an alarm clock ! But, 
exclusive of this, we couldn't have gotten along 
without Mary Margaret, for she's a good friend 
and one of the most lovable of the Seniors. 



Virginia Joye McCuen 

Last year brought "Joye" to the school both in 
name and con notation — a joy which we would 
all miss. Joye's versatility ranges from doing the 
"Charleston" to presiding over the Church School 
Service League. In both, she is most capable, 
which only proves that she knows well the old 
] ih rase, "There's a time to work and a time to 
play." But with all her interests, Joye has always 
time to be helpful and accomodating — if you don't 
believe Joye is just about as fine as they make 'em, 
just ask "Lady." 

Dorothy Beacham 

"Where's Dot? — she'll play for us." We wonder 
what we would do if we didn't have Dot to play 
for our class songs and, for our dances ( f ) in 
gym. Dot has another enviable trait. She is ack- 
nowledged the tidiest girl in Senior Hall, and we 
know this when we see how carefully she keeps 
her room, not to mention her dainty clothes. 
Even if it weren't for these accomplishments, Dot 
would he an indispensable mem her of our class, 
for she lias a marvelous disposition that has en- 
dea red h e r to us all . 



MARtiARKT S.MKDES ROSK 

Margaret was the most envied Senior in school 
the day after Thanksgiving. Who but she would 
have gotten left in Chapel Hill Thanksgiving 
night at the Co-ed house.' — and she tried to say 
she was so worried that she didn't enjoy it '. 
Besides being naturally sweet and smart, Margarei 
hus other great claims to distinction. She's the 
great-granddaughter of the founder of our school 
(which fact alone would make her an outstanding 
character) ; she looks almost exactly like Colleen 
Moore ; and her ukelele playing is the delight of 
Madam Simbolotti. 

Olive Lillian Jordan 

Olive has a reputation we'd all like to have — 
A very quiet gir] who always obeys rules. Well — 
we won't go into details about all the midniirht 
feasts she's been hostess to ; some one might be 
disillusioned if we did. But, really, we're all 
glad to know that Olive is full of fun. Beside* 
having a serious side to her nature. A happy dis- 
position always makes a home so much brighter, 
but — Sh-h-h, editors mustn't publish all they 
know. 

Katherine Hosmkr 

(We apologize for the first descriptive adjective 
but it was so appropriate that we couldn't resist 
the temptation. ) We always think of Katherine 
as being exceptionally reliable, and she never 
fails to help us out of a tight place. For example, 
we remember how she pulled Sylbert out of the 
hall locker — not to mention her wonderful ability 
for creating public opinion on East Wine. 
Katherine says she's going to be an editor. We 
wish to add. "a good one," and shall expect to read 
her editorials with great interest. 

Ann de Treville Lawrence 

Besides being an angel (once), Ann has the 
distinction of having stored in her memory "ob- 
servations of one of the oldest inhabitant-. 
She has almost become one of the traditions of 
Saint Mary's — a tradition of which Saint Mary's 
is proud. She has been exceptionally conscientious 
as President of the Altar Guild, never sparing her 
efforts to beautify the chapel. Of course we all 
love our school, but none of us can love it quite 
as much as Ann does, and certainly no one of 
us could be more loyal. 

Dorothy Dougherty 

"No, I can't. I have to study" — says Dotty, 
taking an English novel and curling on the bed 
to snooze I She is forever and eternally occupied. 
But this is because of her artistic temperament. 
Any time you see some sheets of art paper coming 
down the ball, you know Dot is hidden somewhere 
in their folds. " But, in spite of her constant in- 
dustry. Dot has lots of fun. Always giggling 
about something, or quoting one of. Miss Fenner> 
droll stories, she is the delight of any one who 
happens to be near. 



\ 



Martha Dahney Jones 

"Martha Dabney, you do it, you're the young- 
est" — and the surprising thing is that this infant 
always does it gladly. She lias made a remarkable 
record and we feel duly proud of the youngest 
member of our class. The College Club, so 
loyally defended by her in the E. A. P. Model 
Meeting, could never have been so progressive 
without her; the Seniors would have drowned in 
the depths of despair but for her cheer; and the 
N. U. N. Club renders her a vote of thanks as 
the efficient ■"Custodian of the Veils." 



Margaret Randolph Bullitt 

"Bullitt, here's another cut for you." Oh 
dear, "I'm getting cuts on all sides 1" Don't 
worry, fond readers, the only cuts that our dear 
friend "Bullitt" gets are "ad cuts" — for nobody 
could cut "Bullitt," who is always ever ready to 
help us all. She is clever, good in athletics and 
a mighty sweet girl, even if she is red headed. 
There is just one "Bullitt'' and we are sorry that 
the oncoming Senior class is not to have her, 
but we are glad that she is one of ns. 



FRANCES SH RIVER SaNSBLRY 

"Where's Frances?" 

"Oh, she's over in the Library working on her 
English N notebook." 

Result ? — -We all wish we had been, too, when 
grades are posted. But Frances doesn't spend nil 
of her time getting up notebooks. She is the 
very efficient proctor of Senior Hall ("don't laugh, 
please, this a very serious matter," says Mr. 
Stone), and has been of great help in suppressing 
unearthly screams in the Chapel line! The STAGE 
Coach is very grateful to her for the calendar 
which she contributed, and for other daily (?) 
aids. 

Louisa Harrison 

We are all sorry that "Bonnie" failed to return 
after Christmas. She was with us for only a few 
months, but even in that short time she won a 
place in our hearts. She was immediately recog- 
nized as one of the most lovable girls in the class 
and all the Seniors were proud of her. Besides 
being so lovable, "Ponnie" was a splendid student. 
Can you imagine a new student who can spend 
two or three weeks in the infirmary and get on 
the lion or roll all the same ? She did. 



Alice Towers 

"Will any Senior chaperone me to town ?" 
Whenever you hear that plaintive cry you know 
that Alice has another customer. She is always 
willing to take any one calling or to town, even 
during exam. week. Alice's habit of going out 
before an English N test, has been the envy of 
more than one Senior, but when we realize how 
accomodating she is and how many girls she has 
obliged, we feel justly proud of her. 



Louisa Lee 

"Tootle" : How did you know I was in here? 

Grace: Oh, I heard you! 

"Tootie:" Tee hee. 

Grace: Yes, that's just what I heard. 

Well (apologies to Mr. Stone) who wouldn't 
"Tee hee" if they had come out of Exams, with 
her flying colors? "Tootie's" devotion to her 
hooks just after the Christmas vacation certainly 
produced excellent results — at least 90 per cent 
on all of her Exams.! Of course we're proud of 
this fact but, in spite of it, she is a very valuable 
member of the class. 



Alice Amoret Dewar 

Here! there! everywhere! Who? Why Alice, 
of course. Whether in Senior Hall, the P. O. or 
"on class," she is the same bright, and clever girl. 
Her bits of dry humor will long be remembered 
by all who have known her — who could forget it '. 
At times she hurls sarcasm at us fast and furious- 
ly, but then, it being Alice, we let it go by! ? I ? 
Since it is a custom to say something serious 
about our Senior wonder (and since she is the 
Biographical Editor) here goes — Alice is success- 
fully carrying eight subjects. Serious? Yes, 
but not in all particulars! 



Sara Pvkuington 

Now that we have Sara we've often wondered 
what we used to do without her happy disposition, 
her ability to see the funny side of everything, 
and her pleasant acquiescence in everything that 
is asked of her. We envy her good steady grades 
and she makes them without studying too! When 
some one asked her why she wasn't worried and 
studying for exams she said, "what's the use ?" 
turned over and went to sleep, and then pro- 
ceeded to get nothing under SO on a single 
subject. 

Grace Pennington Martin 

"Grace, will you read your discussion of (what- 
ever the lesson is about)? says Miss Turner; and. 
"Grace, is your Stage Coach material ready?" 
and, "Grace, the Muse is due tomorrow .'" and, 
"Grace, will you dance with me?" Grace being 
Miss Turner's "pride and joy," the literary editor 
of the Stage Coach, the editor of the Mime, 
the best dancer in school, and one of the most 
attractive girls, never fails to do everything she is 
asked with the greatest ease while leaving the 
questioner in an uproar of laughter. 



Annie Battle Miller 

"By cracky, spiffily, spoo" — here comes Annie 
Battle. "Children should be seen and not heard," 
but — oh I there's an exception to every rule (al- 
though Mr. Stone thinks even Annte:""Batth- 
shouldn't be excegtjed-)-r — "Annie Battle is always 
just liu billing over with fun and has proved a 
bright spot on a good many cloudy days, She 
has a wonderful mind, especially for Sociology, 
and often flusters Mr. Stone by her ceaseless flow 
of questions and answers. No one will ever be 



3, 









in the depths of despair while she's around 




(I 



Laura Lloyd Crudup 

"She'll have .1 hard time shooting that goal — 
Lady' i.s guarding her," And whoever "she" is 
certainly has trouble, for "Lady" is a Sigma 
Mainstay, 

Besides basketball, "Lady" has another absorb- 
ing interest. Who is there who doesn't know 
"John Hod die" — from his college honors to his 
breakfast.' If vou don't you don't know "Lady" 
either. 

"Lady" is a good friend (ask Joyce), a con- 
scientious student, and in every way, a necessity 
to the class. But tliere is one time when "Lady" 
is silent — don't expect her to say anything before 
she has wnshed her face! 



Margaret Ellen Lester 

All the Seniors turn green with envy at mail 
time 'cause no matter whether it's as balmy 
as May or as cold as January, Butterfly always 
lias her mail — and most of the time — not one 
letter, but two or three. 

If you want to find the very best "eats" in 
Senior Hall, go to Butterfly's room; and if 
you're looking for a real good looking Senior, 
search for "Butterfly." She's right there with 
the looks every time. 



Celeste Hubbard 

Although Celeste prides herself on saying exactly 
what she thinks, she never makes enemies. She's 
full of fun, too, for if you bear shouts of laughter 
in East Rock, it's sure to lie Celeste telling some 
of her droll stories. If you see a tall, strikingly 
dressed Senior wandering toward the city, you 
may know it's Celeste, for she's always ready for 
a good time, But if you sometimes see a for- 
bidden light shining through her transom about 
twelve, you may know Celeste is studying — and 
probably studying Math! 



Elizabeth J. Thornton 

.hist ask: "Lib. ran you Ml me the date of" — 
(anything you want to know ) , or, "Lib, tell me, 
who wrote the Epistle to the Hebrews '" and Lib 
can and will supply the desired information. Not 
only when you need information is Lib a help, 
but "when a feller needs a friend" there's one to 
be found in her. When she's not busy studying 
or just being a good friend she's being Miss 
Davis's prize star in the Dramatic Club and carry- 
ing off all the honors in plays. 

Susan Womble 
May we present another "Day Student" I 
Susan has been one of our three boasted Raleigh 
girls. She has shown a commendable interest 
in all of her classes, as well as other activities 
of the school. Her ability to ask "leading 
questions" in class has "led" a good many of the 
Seniors into deep water, from which she herself 
has been often forced to rescue us ! Wfl shall 
always remember Susan with pleasure and hope 
that she will try to keep in touch with as many of 
us as possible. 

Susan Jolly 

The Seniors feel duly proud of the characteristics 
of their "Day Students" — no wonder, here is 
one of them! All of our classes have been much 
jollier because of this valuable addition. We regrer 
that she could not have lived with us in Senior 
Hall or East Rock. We shall always remember 
Susan with pleasure and hope that she will he 
as prompt at the first class reunion as she has 
not been at Economics. 

Musette Kitchin 

We are all sorry that Musette has not been with 
us before this year, for she might have made 
some Cloudy days much brighter — but of course 
it would never have done to have Musette here 
before Sara! We all admin' Mu-.etr.-s ;I }.-. f JnT.- 
frankness, which has been so often squelched by 
Mr. Stone. Her knowledge of Sociology has 
stopped many a bard question in its journey 
around the room, and her intense optimism has 
marked her as a most agreeable person. 




Famous Sayings from Famous People 

"Your wisdom be your guide." — Cuba. 

"A world of happy days."' — Annie Baltic. 

"A stitch in time saves nine." — Sea-Shore. 

"Live and thrive." — Mopsa. 

"I will bury myself in my books and the devil may pipe to his own." — Kitchin. 

"Better late than never." — Martha Dabney. 

"A merry heart maketh a glad countenance." — Jolly. 

"Oh! sleep it is a gentle thing beloved from pole to pole." — Ruth. 

"Put on the dauntless spirit of resolution." — Sylly. 



How and JVhen JV e Became Famous 

Btullitt. She patented an improved "adding machine" of inestimable benefit to the 
Stagk Coach. 

Pendleton and Dewar. Authors of a well "pulled-off" closet drama. 

Martin and Miller. Made a valuable addition to the portraits in the parlor. 

Towers. Author of "California, Here I Come." 

Rose. Reported late to breakfast the morning after Thanksgiving. 

Clark. Through "Tib's" reflected glory. 

Jones. Had a birthday. 

Edmonson. Still striving. 

Lyon. Chaperoning. 

Misses Lee and Cobb. Only faculty members at meeting of "all night" study hall 
teachers. (Several Seniors present.) 

Leinster. Accused of confiscating Vick's A. T. O. frat pin. 

Sansbury. Took "Cross" from the Library. 

Piatt. On time for Bible. Tuesday, February 23 . 

Purrington. Answered a question in history, February 26. 

Wilson. Can't account for it — "some people are born great." 

Willis. Kept Bible notes for Senior Hall. 

Hubbard. Kept Bible notes for East Rock. 

Lawrence. October 16, saw the point to a joke (was explained three times). 

Beacham. Room reported untidy — Senior Hall astounded. 

Jordan. Sunday. February 21 — "He" came to Chapel. 







Seventy-fire 












Choice Answers to Selected Questions 
on Senior Exams. 

ENGLISH N 

1. Tell what you know of the development, characteristics, and contribution to life 
of the hysterical novel. Write a well constructed paragraph. 

There are four important influences in the development of the hysterical novel. In 
order of their importance they are: transitional sentences; topic sentences; logical 
arrangement of material; and important dates (all of 'em). 

Now turn we to the characteristics. The hysterical novel is characterized by two 
unique traits: lights after ten p.m., and grades ranging from 50 to 69 per cent. 

Now are we contributing. The main contributions of this important and widely known 
novel are: Monday detention, and additions to the restriction list. For fear of creating 
too much emotion, a more detailed study of this class of the novel is omitted. 

IV. Bible N 

Tell briefly, what you know about the following: 

(a) The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Hebrews: The three things that it is; 
it ain't. 

(b) Eschatalogical: He disappeared one stormy night — we suspect Miss Cobb (she 
hates cats). 

(c) Ephesians: A unanimous circular letter. 

(d) Mark: A dog has one more tail than no dog — no dog has nine tails — therefore a 
dog has ten tails. 

(You don't see the connection? Well, that's the point!) 



VI. Francais M 

Quelle est la difference entre les mots: 



et "maudire." 



dire" 

On (lit a Mile.; on maudit aux jeunes lilies, 
(b) Traduisez en anglais: 

"Traine par deux boeufs tranquilles, a la robe d'un jaune pale" — 
Drawn by two oxen in yellow dresses. (Edmonson version.) 

III. Sociology N 

What has been of most benefit to you in your study of Sociology: 

Each other. — Musette Kitchin and Juliett Smith. 

Study of Man. — Menzies. 

Distinction between ethics and morals. — Wilson and Deioar. 

Acquirement of a suppressed feeling. — Miller. 

Estimation of value of effort vs. grade. — Edmonson. 

Greensboro. — Thorn inn. 

Regularity in dates of written lessons. — Allen. 

Zr-zr-zr-zr-zr-zr (morning nap). — Sea-Shore. 

Marriage and Divorce. — Jordan. 

Origin and influence of ghosts. — Mooley. 

Suppression of expostulation. — Sebrell. 

The Book. — Towers. 

My winning ways. — Jolly. 



Srvrnty* 




Scvcnty-scren 



" — , ; y — ji" 

yfS SlR THATS OUK B A (3 y '• " ^V^ 

*— A . p . JONES ^ ^\o V 



<_ v/All£V 
o /? H4LL 







Srmiti/ cilfltt 




Qj 



Our Song to You 

Our year with you has been a song, 

A song of many parts. 
Its laughing treble strains are gay 
And ripple on from day to day; 

The sadder tones that fill our hearts 
Are lit with memories, smiles and tears — 
The melodies of other years, 

The harmonies of song. 

Throughout our song there is a theme 

That binds the parts in one, 
St. Mary's columns white and strong, 
And Friendship's beauteous, glorious song. 

The oak trees gleaming in the sun, 
The Chapel gray, the cross on high. 
Echoing footsteps, whispered sigh 

Are woven through our theme. 

The melodies of friendship sing 

And pulsate in our song, 
For rising breezes in their flight 
Around the fluted columns white 

Its sweetness will prolong. 
The hours of labor and of fun 
The struggles, and the victories won 

The dearest memories bring. 

The lingering strains now fade away 

And now our song must end. 
The echoes vibrate on the breeze 
And tremble through the tall oak trees 

And sing to every friend — 
"Forget the discords of our song, 
Remember friendships true and strong, 

For we must go away." 

A. Platt 




Seventy 



,„,„• 



The History of the Class of '26 

THE road to knowledge has many paths leading into it and on each one of these 
paths have the members of the class traveled until they have met their fellow class- 
mates and gone on with them. Finally the road branches again and it is then that each 
girl must choose her road and travel it alone. 

The class of '26 has a long history. It began in 1013 when Sylbert Pendleton ventured 
ou her path under the careful guidance of Miss Katie. The next girl to set out on thin 
journey was Ann Lawrence who began in 1917. These two have the honor and privilege 
of being the last who started in the grades under Miss Katie and have gone through to 
graduation. 

Dorothy Dougherty joined them as a baby preplet in the fall of '21. Added to these 
three in '22-23 were Margaret Ellen Lester and Marion Lee as Freshmen with Katherine 
Morris as president, and Alicia Piatt and Mary Margaret Willis as preps. 

At the end of each year as the Seniors turned the bend in the road and were lost to 
sight, our hearts have beat fast with mingled sorrow and joy. The Seniors had left us. 
but were we not another league on our way? We were reluctant to let them go but we 
did not realize that it was the first bitter taste of our last parting when we too should 
be lost from view on the road to knowledge. 

The next year we were Sophomores and Martha Everett, was our president. More 
girls joined us to make our travel happier; they were Dorothy Beacham, Ruth Loaring 
Clark, Katherine Lyon and Annie Battle Miller. At the same time in the Freshman class 
were Louise Allen, Laura Crudup, Louisa Lee and Juliette Smith. It was a happy year 
and we thought ourselves extremely important being the sister class of the Seniors. 
At the end of the year we still walked on; we saw our sister class disappear around the 
bend but our hearts lightened at the thought of one more league gone. 

The road was broadening with every step and despite dust and rain more girls joined 
us. The Fall of 1924 dawned full of expectancy and hope. All the old Juniors, were 
delighted to welcome the new Juniors and conditional Juniors, for these were divided. 
Mary Mutter Moore was president and Miss Ruef our class adviser; under the leadership 
of these two we completed a year of hard work brightened by many joys such as the 
Junior-Senior Banquet. 

Many valuable members of the class were added this year — our attractive Sallie 
Leinster, stylish Alice Towers, domestic Cleave Shore, Celeste Hubbard and Alice 
Dewar — full of spirit, our good sport — Irma Edmonson, artistic Joye McCuen and Susan 
Womble. Elizabeth Thornton with her dramatic talent, Margaret Bullitt — brilliant in 
more ways than one, literary Katherine Hosmer. Olive Jordan with her sweet disposition, 
versatile Grace Martin, charming Olivia Mobley, Mary Nicolson and her mathematical 
brains I for which she is greatly envied), lovable Frances Sansbury, Margaret Rose 
full of humor, and last — and least in years — Martha Dabney Jones, tilled with the 
light heartedness of youth, but intelligence of years. 

In gaiety we walked along the road and did not once realize what an amount of 
ground we were covering until the Junior-Senior Banquet towards which we had worked 
all year finally came. The school party was the saddest thing in the year for Miss 
Morgan was to leave us and it was at this party that we were to bid her farewell. Our 
hearts were filled with the realization of how much we loved her and how much she had 



Eighty 



meant and would always mean to us. Then, before we knew it came class day and the 
daisy chain — and then we saw one more Senior class disappear around the bend in the 
road. Our hearts sank — we were Seniors ourselves! What an unbelievable thing, that 
we had but one league more to travel and we, too, would turn the bend in the road 
to knowledge. 

The Fall of 1925 — a dream realized! Senior Hall reached! Marion Lee was our 
president and Miss Ruef our adviser. Miss Albertson came to be the beloved friend and 
adviser of us all. Even this near the end girls joined us as we walked along. Louisa 
Harrison, Musette Kitchin, Sara Purrington. and Margaret "Wilson immediately entered 
into every thing. Mrs. Samuel Lawrence was chosen an honorary member and Mr. Stone 
our sponsor. 

At the end of a month we were all very much surprised to find that we did not 
feel half so important as the other Seniors had seemed to us. It was not until we 
received our class rings in December that we really felt that we were Seniors. Time went 
so swiftly with its many thrilling events of which some were the Senior Party to the 
Sophomores — an evening in an Apache Den — the Senior plays — Dickens's "Christmas 
Carol" and "The Nativity," which, though long expected, were given in six hours notice 
when school was so suddenly broken up for the holidays. After the plays the Seniors 
carolled but every body missed the long-looked-for Christmas tree. 

After Christmas our sister class returned our courtesy with a party. Also Mr. and 
Mrs. Way gave us a party. When the Sewanee Glee club came (a very big event) Mrs. 
Lawrence gave a tea to the Glee Club members and the Senior Class. Then came Spring 
holidays, Easter, and finally the Banquet. How we did gloat over seeing the Juniors 
work! Now Commencement is here. 

Commencement — what a world of different meanings it includes. The realization of it 
hursts upon us — our walk is scarcely begun; the road has branched again and we can no 
longer tread it together; we must travel alone; we are no longer Seniors for we too 
have turned the bend — we are alumna?! 

A. Lawkence 



; / 
















Last W ill and Testament of the Senior Class 
of St. Mary's School 

Raleigh, N. C, June 1926 

WE, the Senior Class of St. Mary's School, in the city of Raleigh, the county of 
Wake and the State of North Carolina, on this, the thirty-first day of May in 
the year of our Lord 1926, being of supposedly sound and sane mind, in spite of the 
declaration of various faculty members having a strong belief to the contrary, do, both 
individually and collectively, will and bequeath several of our most vahied possessions 
to divers and sundry members of the incoming Senior Class of our beloved school. We 
hope that with the aid of these gifts they may show their ability by passing through the 
coming year as brilliantly as we have done. We further hope that all students — no, 
pupils, will realize just how great a sacrifice we are making, and so will ponder 
diligently upon such benefits as we, in our graciousness, have condescended to bequeath. 

Article I. I, Marion Lee, do will and bequeath my position as President of the 
Senior Class to some lucky successor, hoping that with this gift will come also my 
great dramatic ability as demonstrated particularly in tableaus. 

Art. II. I, Sara Leinster, with joy and thanksgiving, do leave to the treasurer of 
the Senior Class of '27 my little book entitled "How to start collecting dues from the 
Seniors, how to produce a good sob-story effect to obtain them, and. finally as a last resort, 
how to extricate the necessary funds from the combination-locked closets." 

Art. III. We, Susan Womble, Susan Jolly, and our fellow day-pupil. Musette 
Kitchin, do leave to any of our town successors, our uninterrupted attendance at 
classes the twenty school days in each month, knowing that it makes a much better 
impression to come when you should than to come when you want to. 

Art. IV. We, the Seniors inhabiting Senior Hall in East Rock, commonly called 
"Senior Hall's appendix," do warn the members of the Senior Class to come, not to 
inhabit the Rock unless absolutely unavoidable — why? because the sitting-up-facilities 
are decidedly not all they might be. 

Art. V. I, Grace Pennington Martin, in willing my job. it can't be called a position, 
of Editor-in-Chief of the St. Mary's Muse to the one who allowed herself to be so imposed 
upon, leave with it a great deal of sympathy, but, also, a great deal of encouragement. 
It really is lots of fun after all. 

Art. VI. I. Sylbert Pendleton, commonly called "Sylly," do leave to the Editor-in- 
Chief of the Stage Coach my printed slips for calling a "meeting of the Stack Coach 
staff in Miss Lee's Business Room," with a heart felt warning not to take the matter 
of the editorship too seriously. There are plenty of people to whom you can easily 
"pass the buck." 

Art. VII. We, the collective members of the Senior Class dwelling on the upper hall 
of the far-famed "Senior Hall," do exhort our successors to break, smash and com- 
pletely annihilate any and all victrola records belonging to those members of the class 
on the lower floor. Self-preservation will necessitate this step eventually — so why 
not now? 

Art. VIII. I, Ann de Treville Lawrence do will my ability to see jokes to Mary Muse, 
hoping that with constant practice she will improve in this art as much as I have. 

Art. IX. We, the downstairs members of the class of '26, do beg and beseech our 
successors to study diligently the art of "tripping the light fantastic toe" that all the 
masters of this art may not dwell in the higher region of their Senior Hall as ours do. 

Art. X. We. Joye McCuen and Dorothy Beacham. do leave our congeniallity as 
roommates to the next year's occupants of Senior Hall. The outward view is most 
conducive to good fellowship we assure you. 

Art. XI. I. "W" Mobley, do leave to Miss Jennie Trotter the secret of my Titian 
locks with the hope that this secret will save her many tears and disappointments caused 
by the failure of "Golden Glint." 






Aut. XII. I, Margaret Randolph Bullitt, do leave my deliberate manner of articulatinn 

.,,*•/.£';, ,t,;sr„s»„s s k^^^xrasrass » »» 

gateTs SF. do.en'bHckT wfth'tn.' 177'!? the S „ Uldent body pre8ident ° £ '« two 
well in hand le h ° Pe " iat her st,,flent "discussions" may be kept 

Art. XVIII. "He that hath ears to hear let him hear " 

in'sen^Ha^naTsau^ £t VZlT.T ^ ^ « m »»" ™* — 

the mo^^Ynlve goneT t0 *" ° £ M " ^'^ C ' aSSeS at their "»t meeting- after 

!" no'nfr'/ '","• ^ many iDStaDCeS ' Pr ° Ve USel£ W0, ' thy 0I bei »e carried to Bible N 
4. Don t ask embarrassing questions in English N Class Rememhor th» to . 
had no more experience than you have had-that is "along ceS Tines" 

you, R t'oo X Sve MS SSS^Sn^T. r°eel tr^l '* ^ T 00 " ** 
perfect one as our Mrs. Lawre.L, buVthe M weU SSM,T ' ""* & 

adviSr^r SttaS* love' S VnkiX her^n^ °"!' '"J** «*'*•*« Class 
Miss Rue,, that we shall ZZ r^I^^^LT^ h6lP ' Be ^ 

^r^-^Tl W Tl^L s ^:z^^!Z^T n l^ th f knowIedge ot st - 

and "jokical" and the love of all The Senior Class guidance, both Biblical 

gutdTnc^but for thT ffiS™ .fs'T T '^ °i Ur «"*«■*-** only for their 
Their classes have alwa^ be?n a S great VLre S ^ StUQyiDg U " der thenL 

heMnteSunuI He'r ^to'S^.^^T ^ *"? * , Mt l0V6 ° f the Seniors *« 
has been more than fulfilled happiest of our St. Mary's experience, 

0t^t^7iuZ°^:ir^tZnL the w^ 7 an V° a " the St ' h001 offi — »- Class 

ol ;rxxv t r that we ■« "--^ -^^^^^'z,^^ -« 

feelfor^after'know ng he, S s P o r wen f "it T^ ^ "" '° Ve and ™P«* we «« "ut 
of her ideals and indeed^-LW^r^rn'anr.e'LmtrHve"" 8 ' 1 ** ^ "^ Pr <"' e W ° rtty 
Signed and sealed by me on this 31st day of May, 1926. 

Witnessed by F. Saksbtox Rl T " LoARIX(i Clakk. Testator 

M. Wilson 








Eilihlij-lhree 






Class Prophecy 







I WAS the only spirit to cross the Styx that memorable June night. Charon was 
very morose and not at all talkative and I was unusually lonesome. On landing 
I was sadly looking around to see what I should do first, when a guide came to me and 
said, "Your late is already decided. You may stay here in Hades three days and then 
you go below the river Styx, below everything and away from all hope." Since this 
was to be my late I decided to see everything that I possibly could in that place of 
departed spirits. Alter wandering around I found out that I wasn't a stranger there. 

I was surprised to leel the pangs of hunger and so I made an effort to find some food. 
Food, however, became my secondary thought when I saw that the spirits who served 
as waitresses were Ann Lawrence, Alice Dewar, Susan Jolly, and Margaret Wilson. 
After surviving so much experience as Juniors at St. Mary's, they continued their 
vocation in Yellowstone Park. They had become so accustomed to their duties that 
they still flitted about serving and collecting tips. As I was musing over my nectar 
I was startled to see some other of my classmates. 

There were Annie Battle Miller and Tootie Lee in the extreme front row of chorus 
girls. Annie Battle occassionally forgot herself, and began to clog dance but as a 
rule Tootie could, by raising her voice in a song remind her of wiiat she should do. 
There was an extremely graceful girl in connection with these dancers who gave about 
three solos and who received a great deal of applause. As I kept watching her I saw 
a strong resemblance to Grace Martin. Upon asking, I found that it was Grace and 
that she was the leading soloist dancer. However, my informers told me that she 
was a little eccentric and that the only kind of music she would have was the 
mouth organ played by Martha Jones. 

I went out into the cool air of night and wandered on down a path brilliantly lighted 
by glaring torches. I saw a tall yet slightly stooped figure in front of me. Could 
it be? Yes, it was Katherine Hosmer. She still carried books under her arm and 
frowned slightly while talking. From our conversation I found out that she had been a 
successful editor of an excellent Florida paper, and that paper was the "Fort Myers 
Sun." As an editor she was able to keep up with several of the members of our class. 
She said that Irma Edmonson after teaching gym for many years died suddenly while 
in a "Dance of the Raindrops." She reported that Cleave Shore debated the greater 
part of her life over whether 'twas nobler to sew or to study, finally giving the 
weight of the majority to sewing. 

I was glad to have found out such news since I couldn't possibly hope to see every 
one. In fact, I didn't know whether they were all awaiting their call in that happy place 
or not. It was not long after I left Katherine before I found a pleasant spot to rest in 
until morning. 

It was the natural glen very appropriately arranged for rest. As I entered I heard a 
lovely voice lifted in song. Where had I heard that voice before? Yes. in St. Mary's! 
There was Mary Margaret Willis who. in spite of the "family parish priest." was still 
depending for a livelihood on singing. I talked with her and enjoyed recalling the 
"good old days." However, my time w r as short so I retired asking to be awakened rather 
early. 

I was aroused by the sun streaming in the window. Yet it seemed as if the light 
were stronger than the sun. I looked out of my window and beheld in the sky, almost 
shadowing the sun, Margaret Bullitt's face and hair. Yes, it seems that Margaret would 
always be brilliant — even outshining the sun. 

My day had begun all right after having seen Margaret. I started out on my journey 
at once as I had only two days of grace. 

The patlPrhaf T followed led me through a small wooded plot. In the center there 
seemed to be a natural arbor under which a queen should sit. I looked closely to see 
who was sitting there and was overjoyed to see Sallie Leinster. Dot Dougherty, and 
Margaret Ellen Lester. But gracious, there was no chance of my speaking to them 
for they were still trying to make their selection between their many suitors. 



Eighty-four 



Although disappointed at this, I walked on until I saw in the distance a lovely vallev 
How pleasant it seemed there! I couldn't resist my desire to go th rot gh i How erlad 
I was for there I met Alicia Piatt who, after haying completed a 1 her earthly ™ iVl 
well was hying there peacefully with a great many others She selmed onWTo 
Moor„ t. See me , She had leanied that Margaret Rose after succeedfng as Colleen 
Mr hut ZtZV'Z ?T Ct<Hl t0 C, ' 0SS the Styx the salne ni S ht tha : I had made the 

ssrsr .ove^uir the s ; n „°ad l s^ -rate ^ & the ™ ° ? -' ^ 

ShelS„-d\n o a11 that - "- - Cld^ Jftle Se SSKTS^SK" in' 
wa^ooS'at^nd ^IntiJ out^T relation , with «« ""ghbors but sometimes she 

from that t;„ Jilysian Fields. She had made such a loyely May Queen that 

from that time on she continued to hold court. Alice Towers Elizabeth Thl!! 
Susan Womb.e and Musette Kitchin were still serving a J models . on earth Ml e 
specialized in fur coats; and Musette in hunting coats. 

Joyce McCuen had made a good leader in the Church School Service League but had 

E&*\S£ 1 ££S I £* Beacham ' her assistant had been foroe * ^& ** 

Juliette Smith, by being so quiet, at the proper time, had received a nosition Is 

am 1 "niw \ „ aml dUmb SCh001 ' CeleSte Hubbard ' Sara Purringto^ f. France i SanXry 
and Olive Jordan were on earth still living in Hollywood and enjoying 11 be' 

ler , Hfu a 'f d amusements that ""«* a Place could afford." Laura Crudup had ove co e 
her dislike for answering the telephone and was established as a good operator 

The time had flown by in Alicia's company. Still I had not found out about 
Katherine Lyon and Sylbert Pendleton. As I was on my way to the boa in will 
should once more set sail, for possibly the last time. I saw them. Sylbert (by remiest 

sTiwtTomTe"?; ^rvrr 11 ; and : knew tiiat ■ «•>*« S^aJtls^ 

bylbert told me that she had found out about "Kat's" life on earth She had ma i„ . 

XrTa^oCf 2 t0 T ™°lr tSm T nS Det '° e ' ^'"a^s^Fieimng Bu -ney and 
others, and otheis, on and on. Charon chanted his last summons and Sylbert and I 
looking back once more to see the last of the class of '26, exclaimed, "Good bye foreTer! » 

O. MOBLEV 




Sept. 


15. 


Sept. 


28. 


Sept. 


30. 


Oct. 


3. 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


17. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 


26. 


Nov. 


30. 


Dec. 


3. 


Dec. 


14. 



Looking Backward 

Sidelights on the Year 1925-26 
"We see all, know all, and tell it." — Our motto. 

New girls meet last year's most popular Old Girl — Alma Mater. 

Dando returns, late as usual. 

Ruth springs the Little Bear joke for the first time. 

So far Mr. Way's Bible N jokes are coming true to schedule. Ha Ha. 

Pendelton's lecture course begins with record enrollment. "Learn to Live." 

Physical director gives interpretative dance — "Bunyan's Grace Abounding" 

at Junior party. 
Seniors do the ghostly act. 
Founder's Day program begins half an hour late. Marion Lee's hair wouldn't 

curl properly. 
Seniors take in Thanksgiving game. Margaret Smedes returns 12 hours late. 
Bullitt is found out of her room after lights. This was an event! 
Floy Vance breaks up Gym class by appearing sans the usual bloomers. 
Reducing records spoil Martin's rest. Christmas is coming and we must get 
thin. "1, 2, 3, 4— Higher!" 
Dec. 17. Little Tuck gets scarlet fever and a vote of thanks. Home three days early! 

Whoopee! 
Jan. 6. Returned from holidays. Alicia Piatt dangerously in love. Virginia Norton 

returning, true to form, on crutches. 
Jan. 15. School goes to Paul Whiteman concert to see Lelia Cameron's husband. On 

the whole we are satisfied. 
Jan. 23. Girls see "Vanishing American." Lyon and Menzies conspicuously absent. 

Guess they don't care for the movies. 
Jan. 25. Senior Hall breakfasts at 10 a.m. on Hot Dogs and coffee. Thanks Sylly! 
Jan. 26. Senior Hall retires at 10 p.m. Thanks to Sansbury, Shore. Pendleton and 
Dewar for gently pointing out to the authorities the necessity for Miss 
Cobb's sleep. 
Jan. 29. Piatt loses transformation in Bible N. "And he blushed, and she blushed, 
and they both blushed." Thelma Perry goes home to get married. Down 
one! 
Feb. S. Question of Senior gift to school solved! Large photo of Gloria Swanson re- 
ceived by Martin and Miller. An appropriate frame will be purchased by 
Seniors. 
Feb. 14. Valentine's Day. Frances Vick gets another A. T. 0. pin to replace the one 

she lost. 
Feb. 16. Colonial Ball a brilliant affair. Minuet conies off well with only four couples 

out of step. 
Mar. 1. Spring holidays two weeks off. Reducing records appear again. Martin 

can't sleep. 
Mar. 11-17. Spring Holidays. Twelve girls return on time? this betters last year's record. 
Apr. 1. Swimming pool opens as great surprise to all. Mack Sennett has nothing 

on us. Ruth pulls the Little Bear joke again; appropriately perhaps. 
Apr. 28. Margaret Huie returns from Spring Holidays. 
May 15. Junior-Senior Banquet pulled off. Seniors relieved, having feared a hay-ride 

as a substitute for the banquet. 
May 17. May day arrives. So does queen — "God save the King!" 
May 24. Commencement approaching. Annual sale of white begins in Raleigh. 
June 1. Commencement. Please omit flowers — You just dare! 






Eighty-six 




( J HALL Of FAMC 




UUNIORSl 




Eitfltty-scven 




Miss Houchen, Junior Adviser 



■■ 






If 



- . ■ ' 

raj 












Junior Class 

Colors: Red and Gray Flower: Red Rose 

Motto: He iclto conquers, conquers himself 

OFFICERS 

Virginia Evans President 

Fannie B: Aiken Vice President 

Martha Thigpen Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Grace Houchen Class Adviser 

MEMBERS 
Alice Acton Elizabeth Cauthen Laura Owens 
Fannie Bryan Aiken Helen Dortcii Olzie Rodman- 
Helen Badham Virginia Evans Mela Royall 
Edythe Barker Annie Louise Evans Sallie Sattertiiwaite 
Joyce Broadhuust Marjoeie Hi inter Virginia Sedrei.l 
Frances Brown Florence Matthews Nancy Siblett 
Margaret 1 Bcrckmyer Virginia Menzies Martha Thigten 
Margaret Carlton Mary Margaret Muse Mary* Thurman 
Alice Cason Jennie Trotter 

' SCHOOL COUNCIL MEMBERS 
Mela Royall Fannie Bryan Aiken 

Virginia Evans 



Eighly-eigltt 



Virginia Evans 

President 

Saluda, Va. 



Fannie B. Aiken 

Vice President 
Brunswick, Ga. 



Martha Thigpen 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Tarboro, N. C. 












Alice Acton 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Helen H. Badiiam 

Edenton. N. C. 



M. Joyce Broaihhrst 
Dublin, Ga. 



Frances Brown 

Oxford. N. C. 



Margaret Bubckmyer 
Beaufort, S. C. 



Margaret Carlton 
Roxboro. N. C. 



Ninety 



Alice Cason 
Edenton, N. C. 



Elizabeth Cauthen 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Helen Dortcii 
Goltlsboro, N. C. 



Annie Louise Evans 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Maiuohie Hunter 
Kinston, N. C. 







■ 

Ninety-one 



I 

!fk! 



J L. 



■> ,J " 

M 




Florence Matthews 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Virginia Menzies 
Hickory, N. C. 



Mauv Mahgaret Muse 
High Point, N. C. 



Laura Owens 

Charlotte, N. C. 



Mary Read 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



Olzie Rodman 

Washington, N. C. 



Ninety-two 



Mela Royai.i. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 



Sallib Sattehtjiwaite 
Macclesfield, N. C. 



VlBGISIA SEBBELL 

Lynchburg, Va. 



Nancy Sublett 
Harrisonburg, Va. 



Mary Thurman 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Jknnie Trotter 
Greensboro, N. C. 







b3SI 



71 m 




Conditional Juniors 



Nell Bryant 
Martha Crudup 
Helen Duar 
Sarah Hancock 
Edna Faust Harris 
Elizabeth Johnson 
Sallie Lancaster 



Frances Marriner 
Kathleen Mai- 
Theresa Meronev 
Annie Parker Shelton 
Ethel Siielton 
Elise Townsend 
Josephine Williams 






Ninety-four 



! 




'"ill 



A fj£-*fe 









I 




Nincti/six 



Juniors as They Impress Us 

Boots Badham Flaming Youth 

Peggy Borckmyer Orange Crush 

Marjokie Hunter A Jack-in-the-box 

Virginia Evans An old-fashioned miniature 

Virginia Menzies - Vanity Fair 

Nancy Sublett The key to most hearts 

Martha Crudui* A giggle box called Mittie 

Sara Hancock Always just outside assembly door 

Mary Thurman Adored by Helen of Troy 

Joyce Bhoadhurst What's in a name? "Joy to the world" 

Jonnie Muse "I do not care to discuss it" 

Rebekah Wauiiei.i. - A songbird 

Jackie Lawrence Peaches and cream 

Jennie Trotter Persecuted by Stone (s) 

Martha Thigpen "And a little child shall lead them" 

Ethel Shelton Speed! 

Bdythe Barker Striving to overcome the difficulties of speech 

Florence Matthews Ah! but that my laborious efforts might make me a skeleton 

Elizabeth Johnson ) TT „ . . .. , . - . , „ , , , 

(. Heedless to restriction but for a taste ot knowledge 

Laura Owens \ 

Olzie Rodman College Humor 












SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 

DAILY REPORT 






(^^4^ /p 



m 




>d 



4 01 5 









c 
II 

X - 






N 











*»«&*, 

^ 




Familiar Slips 






"-x 



Nincty-ciglit 



Sophomore Class 



Colors: Green and White Plowck: Mwechal Neil Boae 

Motto: Ever onward, ever Milliard 

Class Officers 

Elizabeth Platt President 

Dorset Bruen Vice President 

Genevieve Dando Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Monroe Ctass Adviser 

School Council Members 
Elizabeth Platt Phoebe Harding 




Class Roll 




Anderson 


Galloway 


Andbus 


Garrett 


Austin 


Gaulding 


Barden 


Giddens 


Babber 


Hardin, M. 


Barkley 


Hardino, P. 


Benton 


Hathaway 


Bruen 


Mines 


Bynum 


Hooker 


Carmichael 


Johnston 


Chance 


L.wvton 


Clendenin 


.Marks 


Cross 


Montgomery, 


Cummins 


Phillips 


Curry 


Platt, E. 


Dando 


Pol 


Davenpokt 


Reiii. A. 


Dial 


Scales 


Dickerson 


Seei.ey 


DOAH, S. 


SlNSAHAl 1. 11 


FREEMAN 


Smith, L. 


FlLENWIDEU 


TowNSENI). L. 


Gaillakii 


U/Zl.E 



~~^ 



A. H. 



One Hundred 




3*» 
II 



\{« 



One 77 mill ml one 








SOPH- 




<P 



ISTICATED 




i 




"N 



One Hin„lr<<1 Two 



Freshman Class 



Colors: Purple and Lavender 

Motto: Aim high but reaeh higher 



Flower: V inlet 



Class Officers 

Tryntje Swartwooi) President 

Margaret Clarkson Vice President 

Mildred Weaver Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Bason Class Adviser 

Student Council Member 
Tryntje Swartwood 



'.■MS*'* 







Class Roll 


Battle 




Montgomery 


Burrage 




Peal 


Clarkson 




Perry 


Elmore 




Rhea 


Evins, S. 




Stalling s 


Fletcher 




Stewart 


Freeman, 


B. 


Strickland 


Fray 




Swartwood 


Godfrey 




Tii.lery 


Harris, M. 


Tomlinson 


Hayne 




Trotman 


Huie 




Tucker, C. 


Hoover 




Turner, E. 


Jackson 




Turner, M. 


Johnson, 


J. 


Vance 


Johnson, 


M. 


Wall 


Lackey 




Weaver 


Messick 




Williams 



Yates 






V 



One Hundred Four 




J z"r > 











One Hundred Six 




J 







One Hundred Seven 



Pink and Blue 



Preps 



Motto: Children should be seen and not heard 



Class Officers 

Elizabeth Green President 

Virginia Taylor Vice President 

Marcia Peniok .....Secretary-Treasurer 

Miss Grant Class Adviser 

Student Council Member 
Ei.izaiik/1 n Green 



! 



Class Roll 



Bai.i.ou 
Brogden 
Butler 

Cameron, L. 

Cameron. M. 

Duni.op 

Fox 

Glenn 

Green 

Hazei.l 

Hoi.i.owei.i. 

Hovt 

Jones. E. 

Kramer 



Ltjndy 

Marshall 

Noble 

Oestmann 

Parrish 

Penick 

Pitts 

Shore, P. 

Stoiiii 

Stratton 

S W I FT 

Taylor, V. 

Vick 

Worth 




~^> 



Uitt Hundred Eight 




'.fnr II ii ml red Nine 







I 




Back 




TO 






Prepdom 




One Ilmuhrd Ten 




QJ 




One Euiulrcd Eleven 



lev en 







Day Pupils 



Susan Womulk President 




Alber Anderson 
Meliia Austin 
elizabeth barber 

ALII IE BltOGUEN 

Elizabeth Cautiien 
Sydney Curry 
Annie Louise Evans 

Gl.ENNKN Fl.ETC 'HEIi 

Bii.i.iic Freeman 
Julia Gaillakd 
Maui ha Galoway 
Eleanor Hines 
Aphia Jackson 
Julia Johnson 
Mary Johnson 

Mary Yates 



Musette Kihhin 
Ethel Lackey 
Henrietta Love 
Elizabeth Lundy 
Kathleen May 
Betty Rosk Piiillii': 
Clarke Pitts 
Annk Seeley 
Maude Stallincs 
Mary Starr 
Martha Tillery 
Caroline Tucker 
Susanne Tucker 
Frances Uzzle 
Susan Womble 



One Uiinilred Twelve 



tf 





Greensboro, N, C. 

Expression 



Greenville, S. C. 

Art 



Sewanee, Tenn 

Voice 



• § 



" W 



Hundred Thine.'), 




Mary E. Smith 


DORSEY BrVEK 




Brunswick, Ga. 


Savannah, Ga. 




Art 


Art 




Genevieve Dakdo 




Dorothy Dougherty 


Beaver, Pa. 




Nogales, Ariz. 


Art 




Art 




Jane H. Stat dt 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Orga n 



Mary Margaret Willis 

Norfolk, Va. 

Voice 



Katiiekink Lyon 

AVhiteville. N. C. 

Expression 



One Hundred Fourteen 




One Hundred Fifteen 









■ ..<■-•■. ' : ■ 



life 
ate 



i 




One Hundred Sixteen 




Pan-Archoti Council 

Marion Lee Senior President 

Virginia Evans Junior President 

Elizabeth Platt Sophomore President 

Tkynt.ie Swartwood Freshman President 

Elizabeth Green Prep. President 

Ruth Loaring Clark President of Student Body 

Alicia Platt E. A. P. President 

Katherine Lyon , Sigma Lambda President 

Louise Allen Sigma President 

Mela Roy all Mu President 

Sylbert Pendleton Editor-in-Chief of the Annual 

Margaret Bullitt Business Manager of the Annual 

Grace Martin Editor-in-Chief of the Muse 

Laura Crudup „. Business Manager of the Muse 

Joye McCuen President of the Church School Service League 

Ann Lawrence President of the Altar Q^i-itS 7 ^ 

Martha Jones President of the College CTttby 

1 - ff\ 




__Onp-H\tnilrr& Seventeen 





Altar Guild 

OFFICERS 

Ann Lawrence President 

Laura Crudup Vice President 

Miss MoKimmon First Supervisor 

Miss Herring Second Supervisor 

MEMBERS 

Aiken, F. Evans. V. Miller, A. B. Sedrell, V. 

Allen, L. Giddens, I. Mobi.ry, O. Siielton, A. 

Badham, H. Gregory, E. McCtjen, J. Siif.lton. E. 

Bullitt, M. Harris, E. Nicoi.son. M. Shore, C. 

Cason, A. Harrison, L, Owens, L. Sinsabaugii 

Clark, R. L. Hicks, J. B. Pendleton, S. Smith, J. - 

Cross. M. Hosmgr, K. Pi.att. A. Suhlett, M. 

Crtjdup, L. Johnson, E. Read, M. Thiopen, M. 

Crudup, M. Jones, M. Rodman, O. Thornton, E. 

Dewar, A. Jokdon, 0. Rose, M. Townsend. E. 

Doar, H. Lancaster, S. Royall, M. Townsend, L. 

Dortcii, H. Lawrence, A. Sansuchy, F. Waddell. R. 

Dougherty, D. Maruinkk. F. Sattertuwaite Wilson, M. 



(Jnn Hundred Eighteen 







•v^Ty^ 



£ 







Choir Members 

Mb. Jones Director and Organist 

Miss Cobb , .. Assistant Organist 

Miss Crofut Leading Soprano 

Miss Houchen Leading Alto 

Sylrert Pendleton Crtccifer 



MEMBERS 

Cameron, M. Harrison, L. 

Clark, R. L. Hunter, M. 

Dickerson, M. Hazell. N. 

Dougherty. D. Lawrence, A. 

Dunlop. M. Lester, M. 

Evans, V. Marshall, E. 

Giddens. I. Montgomery, M. 

Hardtnb, P. Platt, A. 

Katiierine Hosmer, Librarian 



Platt. E. 
Swartwood, T. 
Waddell, R. 
Williams, J. 
Willis, M. M. 
Wilson. M. 
Wall, D. 
Wolfe, H. 






One Hundred Nineteen 









§amt UlanTa fBuai> 



ot^^'^l, 



Foi>o4«"' t " 3 " c 'liool [during tbe » 



| Thrw Issue -ffl |^L ore puhUahwl 
during the ■'^jm* JK " n<l 

'forming n AgM^M^ I>T Mabv '» 

' catalogue miWW ^jed In Febru- 

lory. V M±Jr 



many B . _i nl 1 10 



\ ,,,*™^S& ".^.ffi,; AJJm . 



bishop thompsox visits the 

SCHOOL 

by Sn .'°'.h"r r ;;„r°,* h m on ?r d ""• <•» 

Arthur ConoverTb™ '"• Rt - R " 
Condjato of lh T nT„ P "°°' ° "• ""»"»» 
Virgin,., t, '?« D "."»« =' Southern 



Virginia. To/oFd „ T"° " S °"""»i 
"'"a.ure BI,ho„ rllL™'"""' »'» 




School. Rnl.'lBh, 



M..» 



jW> 



"no the bishop tafkJ 
minute, i„ , h8 ' d ';™"' 
"" of his pi, 



null' >-»■*, 

„.,«<e VS.» ; Kr'-> 
>">"Vul .Irt^.jC* t»S 

\frr-c 4 o.°*v'^>ei 



AM"MXAE NUMBER 

** , 53 Grace Martis Editor-in-Chief 

* l ''Martha Jotjks 

ECATBEBTKB HOSMEII 



L Utaotatc Editor* &■&* w .. 



Ouftt M-.HLKY flodc/ W mtor n4' 

Heuw DnrrrB TAtorarv Editor *5jy 




<Y\\o ■ 






'„<*■ ■vO* \« .HF.l.K.t DonTI'll ,,l,OW„ r.'>r>'T v - , --.^i.-- ' t d.\"r CV .V-- ^f- 

lW «"»* , i, ,V««, k ,„,.„„,ti, Platt S.W »« Bailor o»'< '* M« „ r cO»*',tt»» 






Concerning the Classes 



o»tt°?.J 



irW 



art* 



de»e" B 



. »' 



SENIOR CLASS 



»»' 







„VV0O 



>a>? ,V'.>«« 



Duo to the fact that Mary Mutts// a $] £%*3&P$* <£ l* & w»*^ 
Moore, who had been elected presiden / g = ^ 5 _j B° v , «d«*Saft *-- \ ea 
at a meeting of the lo-be-Senlors at U ' \ 9 ? ^, w l *„cl»V l * 



close of the 1925 sesBlon, did not cor J^S *£■&■ ' t tV 

. . back, It was necessary to elect a ry £,o« «__ l0 c» fl1 

iresident at the beginning of this yf = ^ o ■ § , \a c - 

, VjH MImb Marlon Lee. the newly eler ^i^Vw 
VN^* resident, has proved herself 
srthy of the office. Other Sen! 



■>£&&>&£ 



. o R L ' 



>' 



Ol 6V c „«l° ' j 



ftV^j 






Vice-President, Olivia 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



iff 8 



c ^ ot u^ al 9 




^r H ' ^■.u' 1 ^" 



;»v ■ 



».»» 



ot 



THE JUNIOR CSLASS 

a 1925-26 sesaion of Salol Mary's *°ke 'h^ 

z*° 1 gave forty-thrco members lo (lie «° Bully _ _ 

class. locludloK the coodillonal '»• slloiiod tweoty „ 

,, ivho bare not anile read -1 ™". and .pint, blsh b», ' """' «"ns 

nil growth. The president, "Wed their n,,,' iff. ""s thorongbly 
■, Virginia Evans. • cow # _ ?J _ J.H. , or | d „,"««» « It. life „, 



Pennies and 
at the eod of 



,vt" u , orker who has aireaoy ',->« 7 a, -'.fj^'a. 
«««"*. capable of holding tblr « r, '»,, »., '//.„ 



■ other days 



T Tire 11 * .. L'llLriiuic u» ,»u.«."d n. t - i_*r* '//> ', 

^r>o^ v e^ et ' president, Fannie Bry? ^JWjfBlJ «J 



s tot^ngeoi* ,,,,1 n '* in, and no one could 



to^^V> 



*/$>»*• *e*i wt o - G^i, ^ The secretary nntf fcAgV *£ '"'o' >T */ tt ' 

£^£*£ZS T\S:^"S*- P nw. ^ Thlgpen. The / U^W «/- ^/^^V*"^ 

#?/**/# ir a«»fe S- «S , PT t Council are Vi/ ^> ^ */,> /j » a^* */>-- 




From five lo alx o'clock on tno after- 
- " >.t noon of Mondo y- October 19. the mem- 
B -2 JS^E-^rl fc- ' ? e . r , s ° r the CoHece Club wore dellKht- 
s -a oj^ |«* £ulty euteriainod at a tea given by Miss 



Ona Hundred Twenty 




One Hnniliied Tict-nfti-onr 









Colors: Green and Gold 



Epsilon Alpha Pi 



Motto: Esse Quam Videri 



Flower: Jonquil 



OFFICERS 

Alicia Platt President 

Mary Margaret Willis Vice President 

Annie Battle Miller Secretary 

Laura Crudup Treasurer 

Miss Cook Faculty Adviser 






AXDKUS, H. 

Badham, H. 
Ballou, J. 
Bardin, E. 
Battle, J. 
Broad hurst, M, 
Brown, F. 
Bryant, N. 
Burrage, N. 
Butler, E. 
Chance, M. 
Clark, R. L. 
Clarkson, M. 
Clendenin, D. 
Cross, M. 
Crudup, L. 
Crudup, M. 
Cummins, T. 

DEWAR, A. 

Dial, R. 
Doab, S. . 

DORTCH, H. 

Evans, V. 
Fray, L. 
Gaulding, E. 
Giddens, I. 
Glenn, R. 
Godfrey, M. 
Griffith, J. 



MEMBERS 
Hancock, S. 
Hardin. M. 
Harding, P. 
Harris, M. 
Hayne, S. 
Hooker, P. 
Horne, M. 
Hosmer, K. 
Hoyt, B. 
Hubbard, C. 
Hunter, M. 
Johnson, E. 
Jones, E. 
Jones, M. 
Jordan, O. 
Kramer, E. 
Lancaster, S. 
Law-ton, C. 
Leinster, S. 
Mabrixer, F, 
Mkroney, E, 
Messick, T. K. 
Milleb, A. B. 
Montgomery, A. 
Montgomery. M. 
Muse, M. 
McCuen, J. 
Parrish, M. 

L\\RROTT, N. 



Paul, V. 
Pexick, M. 
Pickett, E. 
Platt, A. 
Platt, E. 
Poe, M. 

Pl'RRIXGTOX, S. 

Read, M. 
Reid, A. 
Rodman, O. 
Rose, M. 

Satterthwute, S. 
Scales, L. 
Sebrell, V. 
Shore, C 
Smith, L. 
Smith, M. 
Swift, L. 
Thurman. M. 
Towxsexd, E. 
Townsexd. L. 
Turxer, M. 
Vaxce, F. 
Vi.k, F. 
Wall. D. 
Willis, M. M. 
Wolfe, H. 
WOODBDBY, M. 
WuRTH, E. 



Miss Herring 
Miss Riley 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Miss Cooke 
Miss McKimmon 
Mrs. \Veedon 



Miss Bell 
Miss Cobb 



^> 



Hundred Twenty-two 



COACh 








One Hundred Twenty-three 



hi 

mSkwm 

9HHT i ^S^^ 


t 1 J 

* A- ^ 




Bill 






J 


1 IKHJUu J* 1 













biter-Society Debaters 



Subject 

Resolved, That the State o£ North Carolina should appropriate funds for the establish- 
ment of sea ports on her coast. 

Affirmative Negative 

Katherine HoSMEE, '26 E. A. P. Margaret Wilson. '20 Sigma Lambda 

Mary Margaret Muse. '27 E. A. P. Mela Royai.i., '27 Sigma Lambda 






~^> 



One Jin nth ■■><] Tv/entff'fouT 




Commencement Marshals '26 

Martha Thigpeh Chief Marshal (Sigma Lambda) 

Sallie Sattekthwaite E. A. P. 

Marjory Hunter B. A. P. 

Virginia Menzies Sigma Lambda 

Mela Royall Sigma Lambda 



' — 

C ' rift: 

Our Hunilred Twenty-five 



Colors: Purple and Gray 



Sigma Lambda 



Motto: Lit with the Sun 



Flower: Yellow Jasmine 



OFFICERS 

Kathebine Lyon President 

Grace Martin Vice President 

Marion Lee Secretary 

Martha Thigpen Treasurer 

Miss Thornton Faculty Adviser 



A I KEN, F. 

Allen, L. 
Barker, E. 
Barklet, F. 
Beacham, D. 
Benton, A. 
Bruen, D. 
Bullitt, M. R. 

BURCKMYER, E. 

Bynum, N. 
Cameron, L. 
Cameron, M. 
Carlton, M. 
Carmichael, A. 
Cason, A. 
Crocker, B. 
Danco, G. 
Dayenport, V. 

DlCKERSON, M. 
DOAR, H. 

DORSETT, M. 

Dougherty, D. 
Dunlop, M. 
Duval, E. 
Kdmonson, I. 
Elmore, F. 
Evins, S. 
Fox, M. 
Freeman, A. 
Fulenwider, M. 



MEMBERS 

GARRET, M. 

Green, E. 
Gregory, E. 
Griffith, D. 
Harris, E. 
Harrington, M. 
Harrison, L. 
Hathaway, C. 
HAZKLLj N. 
Hicks, J. B. 
Hollowell, M, 
Hoover, M. 
Huie, M. 
Johnston, A. 
Lawrence, A. 
Lawrence, V. 
Lee, L. 
Lee, M. 
Lester, M. E. 
Lyon, K. 
Marks, C. 
Marshall. E. 
Martin, G. 
Matthews, F. 
Mknzies, V. 
Moblky 

XlCOLSON, M. 

Noble, S. 
Oestman 
Orr, C. 
Owens, l. 



Peal, V. 
Pendleton, S 
Perry, T. 
Pritchktt, K 
Reeves, L. A. 
Rhea, M. 
Royall, M. 
Sansbury, F, 
Shelton, A. 
Shelton, E. 
Shore, F. 

SlNSABAUGH 

Smith, J. 
Stewart, D. 
Strickland, E 
Sublett, X. 
Swart wood 
Talbert, E. 
Taylor. A". 
Thigpen 
Thornton 
Tomlinson 
Towers 
Trotman, M. 
Trottkr, -T. 
Turner, M. 
Waddell, k. 
Weaver, m. 
Williams. E. 
Williams, -I. 



L. 



Miss Davis 
Miss Sutton 
Miss Thornton 
Miss Monroe 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Miss Fknnkr 
Miss Crofut 
Miss Ruef 
Miss Bason- 



Mr. Ti« ker 
Mr. Stone 
Miss Houchen 
Miss Grant 



One Hundred Twenty-six 












One Hundred Twenty-seven 






A Legend of the Pines 



- !?■.;■■■ 






HE 



By P, 



II 



E.A.I'. 



EAST Carolina abounds in folk lore. There are Mauteo, Ocracoke and stormy 
Hatteras around which have grown up strange tales of the early settlers. 
Equally strange, although perhaps nol so widely known, is the story of the hoof- 
prints which have remained impressed in the earth for over two hundred years. 
About three miles from the banks of the Pamlico River, just off a tiny winding 
road leading to the county seat of Beaufort, one finds them, two shallow depressions, 
indentations about a yard apart in the midst of the long leaf pine. A path leads 
to them from the road — a path worn by the feet of the many natives am! 
tourists who visit the spot in a vain attempt to obliterate the prints. Both scientists 
and geologists have endeavored, and failed to explain this phenomenon. 

1 1 was the time of the early settlement of Xorth Carolina. Along the shores 
of Pamlico and inland, here and there, were scattered rude farms connected by 
rough roads — the beginnings of a settlement. Here and there a house and a 
store, all unpainted pine affairs, communities dreary and desolate. Upon a clear- 
ing, near the settlement, stood a tiny, unpretentious chapel, bare alike of beauty 
or comfort, but the heart and soul of the toiling pioneers, the stern, hardy 
foundations of our present civilization. Such was the Zion meeting house and 
such was the character of its members. 

The pines round about the small white chapel blent their whispering with the 
earnest prayers of the group of settlers within. Save for this sound all preserved 
the Sabbath calm. These people wrestled uncomplainingly with the Carolina 
soil on six days of the week, but mi the seventh — in every heart was written — 
"Remember thou keep holy the Sabbath day." Within the chapel the minister, 
an old man broken by the rigors of his hard life yet still fired by the Spirit, 
exhorted his tiny flock to win the eternal blessings of the Heavenly Country — 
another new land, but free from the privations and hardships of this one. 

Among the soberly dressed group of work-worn men and women, of children 
drowsy by the lengthy discourse and the sultry heat of the summer afternoon, 
there was one, Judith Wadsworth, in somber black, who seemed by all outward 
appearances to have nothing in common with those around her. The settlers 
knew nothing of her save that she had come from England with her father and 
one servant, and together they had built a home not more than three months 
before the death of the old gentleman. After his death Judith continued to 
live in the cabin with only the quiet servant for a companion. She did not seem 
to lack money. It was whispered that in England her father had owned large 
estates. Nor would she have lacked friends, but she seemed to shrink from 
them like a hunted thing and repelled all advances, so that settlers bad at length 
discontinued their efforts in order that the Great Healer. Time, alone might 
assuage her grief. The reason why she bad ever come to these Carolina wilder- 
nesses or why, since now she was alone in them, she did not go back to the 
Mother Country, was shrouded in mystery. To the queries of the curious her 
father had always returned the most noncommittal answers; his daughter repelled 
any such questions before they were uttered. 



Our Unnilrt'd Twenty-eight 



Today, as she sat in the back of the rude meeting house she wondered idly what 
these reverent pioneers would have said could they have had access to her innermost 
thoughts. Never again would she be allowed to enter into this house of worship — 
of that she was sure. Perhaps, a despised thing, she would be sent from this 
region altogether. Judith glanced curiously over the congregation. They under- 
stand her former life? Perish the thought! 

The sermon Has at an end. Now the minister was sending up a prayer of 
thanksgiving for the safe voyage of the ship just arrived from England. 

Turning toward the open doorway through which the sunlight poured like, molten 
gold, Judith chanced to espy two figures far down flic hut sandy road, two persons 
on horseback coming quickly nearer. She wondered who they might be. Every 
able-bodied settler round about was in the chapel. Could it be that these strangers 
brought bad news from the settlers farther down the river? Such thoughts 
thronged her lira in as the riders steadily galloped onward. Then she remembered 
the ship at anchor in the river. Of course, these must be two of the new arrivals. 
They came frequently now, nun seeking adventure, or a means of retrieving 
fallen fortune. Quite suddenly the realization was forced on her that if the 
number of newcomers should increase she must needs seek an even more secluded 
place. No one should ever know — and then — she saw him ! Rupert, as darkly 
handsome as formerly, yet with bloodshot wild eyes as she had seen him only on 
one memorable oecassion. The door of the church shielded her from his sight, 
as with a pale, slight youth he drew near, almost up to the steps of the rustic 
chapel. The sweating horses snorted and tossed their heads at the restraint of 
the bridle. 

Judith felt as if the room were whirling about her. Her heart throbbed wildly. 
Her face, became corpselike in its pallor as she shrank back against the rough hewn 
pew. "O God ! they could not intend to come in ! Why had she thought she 
could ever mingle among people without dread of discovery — even in a house of 
prayer! There was no escape. Her secret would be wrenched mercilessly from 
her.'" 

Attracted against her will, she glanced again through the doorway. The two 
riders were in the midst of a dispute. That they were both reeling drunk was 
plainly evident. Rupert's voice came loudly to her ears. "Damme ! a church ! 
a fine place this is o' Sundays. Where' d a man go for a glass of port or for 
company after his own heart? Not here in this nest of long-faced Puritans whose 
only amusement is hymn-singing !" 

The pale youth gave a derisive laugh — "Lord ! Ami that nag you're on could 
well make you feel that way. No wonder y' made excuse to draw rein here in the 
shade. Run him longer and he'd drop in his tracks. A fine figure ye cut, indeed!" 

"Egad ! ye are a great one to laugh — I'll warrant this horse would leave yours 
far behind in a matched race. The tall pine yonder as a goal, ('mm — ." 

He was interrupted by a commotion at the door of the chapel. Hurtling down 
the steps came Tim Alligood, rawboned, active. On he came, followed closely, by 
several of the younger youths welcoming this opportunity for an escape from the> 
rigid confinement of the chapel and scenting, in this, chance for sport. Lurching 
in their saddles the drunkards shouted at them a torrent of abuse. The horses, 5 ' 
startled by the noise, tossed their manes and pawed at the earth. 

One Hundred Tw.enttOnine 



t 1 ' te?~- I 



i. -"'a : 









Tim grasped the bridle of the swarthy man's horse. "Can't you see there's 
a service going- on in the chapel?" he demanded hotly. "Clear away from here, 
you two, and do it quick! This ain't the place for a race either. Such as you, 
England would do well to keep home. We don't like your type here!" 

Rupert, thus checked, flamed with anger. With a loud oath he turned his 
horse so sharply that the rein was torn from Tim's hand. The horseman over 
his shoulder called out to his younger companion, who had half turned his horse 
towards the roadway. What he said was unintelligible to the native men and 
boys, but it had the effect of the lash of a whip on the younger rider. He whirled 
his horse and came furiously toward Rupert. "I'll race you, yes, but with 
God as a witness you'll take back those words or you'll settle with me later." 

From where she sat, Judith alone could plainly see how deftly the two riders 
evaded the grasp of the backwoodsmen and had lashed their horses into a furious 
pace. Within the chapel, somehow the minister was ending the service. She 
did not heed him. Irresistibly she was watching the rapid progress of the thick- 
set older man. He was drawing ahead of the youth. His drunken excited 
shouts were borne hack to her. She could not keep her eyes away from that 
swaying horseman — and how she hated him ! 

Suddenly a piercing shriek ran out through the chapel. The horse in the 
lead had come within a yard of the tall, stately pine and more abruptly than the 
eye could follow had stopped short, his hoofs spraddled far apart and by the 
unexpected impetus had hurled the rider headlong directly in front of the tree. 
The body struck the trunk with a sickening thud. It fell, sprawled incongruously 
at the tree's roots. The blood spurted from the neck where the head dangled 
hideously. 

After that one cry, Judith became strangely still. She did not appear to notice 
the group gathering around that prostrate form, nor the outpouring of the con- 
gregation to the fateful spot. The shadows lengthened, yet she sat immovable as 
a statue. So he was dead and the secret would be locked in her heart safe forever. 

She stole from the meeting house; never again was she to enter its doors. Tin' 
last curious loiterer had taken himself home. There was no human being within 
sight. Cautiously she crept to the base of the pine. Perhaps there she might find 
something, however small — . In the last light of the dying day she closely 
scrutinized the turn. There was not the slightest trace of the tragedy save for 
the trampled appearance of the ground. Yet — wait — A yard from the tree two 
deep indentations just beneath a low spreading bush which undoubtedly had 
protected them from obliteration by the feet of the curious throng. Two hoof- 
prints — all. 

And the pines 'round about caught the half-mad whisper — "Forever — in lasting 
remembrance — never to be erased !" She knelt down and fiendishly hollowed out 
the loose dirt, deepening the imprint. When she had finished, she startled the 
wood with a hoarse grating cry, more befitting a witch than a woman in the 
prime of life. Then rocking back and forth she crooned over and over — "never- 
to-be-erased." 

The spot became for a few days after the fatal ride a mecca for the curious. 
It was not until after a severe summer storm a fortnight later that a group of lads 
reacting the incident for their personal satisfaction, uprooted accidentally the 



<>«<■ Hundred THrhi 



STAC 




tiny hush and found underneath the two hoofprints seemingly untouched by the 
torrents of rain. The scraggy bush could not have protected them to such a degree, 
and the boys scattered forthwith throughout the settlement the uncanny tale. It 
was regarded as a boyish prank and the story was little believed until on passing 
the spot the next Sunday, Tim Alligood and the minister saw with their own eyes 
the bare impressions. They stooped and half sheepishly filled the hollows with 
handfuls of dried mosses and pine cones. The next day on passing the tree 
the minister found the shallow pits absolutely empty of the debris. When this 
was noised abroad, there grew up for the villagers a sort of fascination about 
the spot, and many were the ways attempted by which the tracks might he 
obliterated. All were equally futile. The morning after would reveal the tracks, 
two empty shallow hollows in the earth. At one time curiosity and interest were 
so aroused that watchers were set, but ever skillfully, with the craft of a crazed 
woman the slim, black robed Judith evaded their vigilance. The following day 
the tracks were as evident as on that first Sunday. 

Judith herself from the day of the accident never came in contact with the 
people of the settlement. Her tiny cabin, set apart from the general cluster of 
buildings, was shared only with the woman who had come with her from England — 
a creature almost as ghostly and retiring as her mistress. Together they lived 
a mysterious existence — the silent woman the only go-between with the outside 
world. Men shunned her abode as they would that of the Evil one himself. Her 
life was the subject for endless conjectures, all to no purpose. As time went on 
her name was used to terrify children, and by the very mystery of her they were 
silently awed into obedience. 

Not during her lifetime did the settlers connect Judith with the tragedy at the 
foot of the pine. This was revealed only when, years later, the servant woman 
one cold, stormy morning came beating excitedly on the door of the nearest house 
and, in answer to her wild summons, a searching party hastily organized and went 
to scour the bleak woods. They found a gray, misshapen hag — the woman who had 
been Judith Wadsworth — bent rigid in death over the hoofprints at the foot 
of the pine. 

The two hoofprints still remain. Natives and strangers alike have dug up 
and filled, in turn, the depressions for over two centuries. Returning on tin' 
morrow all have found the tracks as distinct and visible as before. The tall pine 
lias long since gone to decay, the white chapel has been torndown. Yet there tie' 
footprints are to this day firmly imbedded in the earth. Since the death of Judith 
Wadsworth no grass has grown within three feet of the tracks, and the natives say 
and believe that the spirit of that lonely woman returns every night to the blighted 
spot, and with ghostly talons lays bare the only earthly token of her sin. 







One Hundred Thirty-one 






"Sunset 



•> •> 



jffe 
■it* 

m 






Winning Poem in Lnter-society Contest 

npilE light dies out behind the western hills; 

-*- The clouds that were gold and rose just now, are gray ; 
The mist creeps slowly up the river road; 
The hills are black as the colors fade away. 
The sun is set. 

One baby star peeps over the silver edge 
Of the crescent, moon that hangs in the saffron west; 
The tree frogs sing in the dark of the big pine tree; 
A sleepy bird flies slowly home to its nest. 
The world is still. 

The shadows steal from the dusk of the whispering woods; 
The fireflies dance in the fields of ripening corn; 
The sheep bell tinkles its homeward tune ; 
The noise and bustle of work is hushed and gone. 
For night brings rest. 

Makuaret Randolph Bullitt 

(Sigma Lambda) 



One Hundred Thirly-lwo 



^^ 




One Hvnihrd Thirty-three 



i-'u Ift H fX'-J 

4< 





SB 


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k 


AlfiflEj 


4(~ ' T :l- 1 


• ' IM 


1); | ■ 








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tscjl J 


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College Club 

Martha Jones President 

Margaret Wilson Vice President 

Irma Edmonson secretary and Treasurer 





MEMBERS 




Bark ley 


Harding 


Parrish 


Beacham 


Harris, E. 


Peal 


Brown 


Hayne 


Platt, A. 


Bruen 


Hazei.l 


Platt, E. 


BULLITT 


Hicks 


Poe 


Butler 


Hollo well 


Read 


Cameron 


Hooker 


Sansbury 


Chance 


Hoover 


Sebrell 


Clark 


Hosmer 


SlNSABAUGH 


Clarkson 


Hoyt 


Strickland 


Crudup, L. 


Johnson 


Sublett 


Cbudup, M. 


Jones 


SWARTWOOl) 


Dewar 


Lee, L. 


Taylor 


Doar. H. 


Lee, M. 


Tiiigpen 


DORT'CH 


Marriner 


Towers 


EDMONSON 


Martin 


TriiNER 


Evans 


Matthews 


Williams 


Evins 


Muse 


Wall 


Fox 


Noble 


Worth 


Green 


Oestmann 

Owens 


Willis 



One Httndrt'd Tltirlij-fnur 





Glee Club 



Miss Crofut 




Director 










MEMBERS 




Brodgen 


Evans, V. 


Marshall 


Bryant 


Harding, P. 


Parbott 


Bullitt 


Harrison 


Phillips 


Cameron 


Hazell 


Sansuurt 


Clark, R. L, 


Hosmer 


Seeley 


Cross 


Hunter 


SWAETWOOD 


Dewar 


Jones, M. 


Thigpen 


DORSETT 


Lancaster 


Willis 


DuNLAP 


Lawrence, A. 


Wilson 


Edmonson 




Wall 









Our Eint,Ir.;l Thirtil-fire 







Dramatic Club 

Tryntje Swartwood President 

Margaret Wilson Secretary-Treasurer 

[Catherine Lvon Business Manager 






m&&. 



';:■: 
i 



■4 r 






k I 
ir 



Helen Andrus 
Annie Benton 
Frances Brown 
Mary Cross 
Thelma Cummins 
Helen Doar 
Dorothy Dougherty 
Elizabeth Green 



MEMBERS 

Elizabeth Gregory 
Miriam Hardin 
Martha Jones 
Ann Lawrence 
Margaret Lester 
{Catherine Lyon 
Elizabeth Marshall 
Grace Martin 



Mary Muse 
{Catherine Pritchett 
Vhiginia Sebrell 
Lorraine Sinsabaugh 
Tryntje Swartwood 
Elizabeth Thornton- 
Jennie Trotter 
Margaret Wilson 



One Eundrai Tliirlysix 




Dramatic Club Plays 



mm. 

Uffli 



One -Simdicd Thirty-seven 




Granddaughters and 
of St. 



Great- Granddaugh ters 
Mary 's 



Margaret Smedes Rose-. 
Laura Li.oyd Crudup 



..President 
..Secretary 



Margaret Cameron, Raleigh. N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Margaret Haywood, Raleigh, N. C. 

(laughter ot 

Theodora Marshall. Raleigh, N. C. 

Laura Lloyd Crudup, Kittrell, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Elizabeth Priscilla Pender, 

Tarboro, N. C. 

Martha Coffield Crudup, Kittrell, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Elizabeth Priscilla Pender, 

Tarboro, N. C. 

Helen Dortch, Goldsboro, X. C. 

granddaughter of 

Martha Pender. Tarboro. N. C. 

daughter of 

Elizabeth Lewis. Tarboro, N. C. 

Irma Giddens. Norfolk. N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Mary Elizabeth Pugh, Pitt County 



Pheobe Randolph Harding, 

Washington, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Elizabeth Hughes, Washington, X. C. 

Miriam Harden. Greensboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Alexina G. Ballard. Wilmington, X. C. 

Margaret Hoover, Hartsville, S. C. 

granddaughter of 

Mary Garret, Enfield. X. C. 

daughter of 

Mary Harrison. Enfield, X. C. 

Annie Gray Johnston. Tarboro, X. C. 

granddaughter of 

Annie Gray Cheshire. Tarboro, N. C. 

daughter of 

Elizabeth Xasii. Tarboro, N. C. 

Martha Dat.xey Jones. Williamsburg, Va. 

granddaughter of 
Mary Smith Rt ffix. Charles City County 



One nu nil ml Tliirtll-eiiilit. 



c 



STAGE 




J 




Virginia Lawrence, Lumberton, N. C. 

daughter of 

Emma Norwood, Wayuesville, Va. 

Louise Lee, Freemont, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
Jane Cutler, San Francisco 

Grace Pennington Martin, Tarboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Victoria Fogan, Williamston, N. C. 

Florence Matthews, Rocky Mount, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Mary E. Lindsay, Rocky Mount. N. C. 

Annie Battle Miller, Greensboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Annie Asiie, Hillsboro, N. C. 

daughter of 

Rosa Ashe Battle, Raleigh, N. C. 

Frances Olivia Mobley, Danville, Va. 

granddaughter of 

Annie Rush Noruom, Edenton, N. C. 

daughter of 

Olivia Sjiith, Reidsville, N. C. 

Laura Owens. Charlotte, N. C. 

daughter of 

Laura Bingham, Salisbury, N. C. 



Sylukrt Pendleton, Raleigh, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Sallie Hall Smith, Scotland Neck, N. C. 

daughter of 

Eliza Busiiee. Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Smedes Rose. Greenville, S. C. 

granddaughter of 

Henrietta Harvey-, Raleigh, N. C. 

daughter of 

Margaret Harvey Smedes, Raleigh, N. C. 

Louise Scales, Salisbury, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Henrietta Hall. Salisbury, N. C. 

daughter of 
Fan MoNeeley, Salisbury, N. C. 

Frances Vice, Littleton, N. C. 

granddaughter of 

Fannie Kingsland, Littleton, N. C. 

Virginia Taylor, New York, N. Y. 

daughter of 

Mary B. Renn, Durham, N. C. 



Mollie MacGlll, Greensboro, N. C. 

granddaughter of 
Elizabeth Green. Louisburg, N. C. 

Fannie Bryan Aiken. Brunswick, Ga. 

granddaughter of 

Frances Maud Bryan, New Bern, N. C. 



One nunilred thirty-nine 








ifjfV 








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At Mil 


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Sketch Club 

Dorothy Dotjo.her'ty President 

Jove McCuek Vice President 

Louise Scales Secretary-Treasurer 



: <V. 



Iff 



MEMBERS 


Andrus 


HOIXOWELL 


Ballou 


Marshall 


Bruex 


Morris 


Clarkson 


McCuen 


Daxdo 


Noble 


Davenport 


Pl.ATT. E. 


Dial 


Pritchett 


Dougherty 


Scales 


Dickebson 


Smith, M. 


Elmore 


Ticker. S. 


FULEN WIDER 


Turner, E 


Hardesty 


Vick 



One Hundred Forhj 



THE THREE MUSKETEERS 

Motto: "It's the way we have in the 
army" 

Athos S. Pendleton 

Porthos L. SCjU.es 

Aramis .D. Dougherty 



THE ONLY CHILD CLUB 

They say we're spoiled, but we're riot 

Floy Vance President 



Brown 


Miller 


Cason 


Oestmann 


Freeman 


Sansbuky 


Hollo well 


Shoke 


Marks 


Towers 


Mareiner 


Vance 



VlCK 



POETRY CLUB 



Ruth L. Claiik 
Sylbert Pendleton 
Margaret Bullitt 
Ann Lawrence 



Martha Jones 



Mela Royall 
Frances Brown 
Nancy Stjblett 
Alicia Platt 




si- ■ , 






One Hundred I'o 



ruj-onc 



ioM\/\UOM O^CAh 




One Hundred Forty-two 








One Hi'hihed Tort [/three 








DIEU ET LES HOMMES 

"You made me wot" 
I yam today I hope 
You're satisfied 



Menzies 



York 

McGii.l 

Lyon 



Leinstee 



SAINT MARY'S SISTERHOOD OF 
N. U. N. S. 

Motto: F. V. 8. 

Abbess C. Shork 

Sub-abbess F. Sansbitvy 

Scribe S. Pendleton 

Custodian ot the Veils M. Jones 

Publican M. Bullitt 

Sinner A. Dewar 

Novice I. Edmonson 

Excommunicated Sister ....A. Lawrence 



S(IX) M(ERRY) SUPS I 

Motto: Always laic, but never too late 

"Feeble" Phoebe Harding 

"Tuck" Caroline Ticker 

"Ginger" Virginia Taylor 

"Piatt" Elizabeth Pi.att 

"Betty" Elizabeth Green 

"Marg" Margaret Godfrey' 



One numlrrd Fortij-ftiur 







One Hundred I'orly 









> 






Sigmas 1925-26 



Colors 



Red ritul White 






OFFICERS 

Louise Allen President 

Margaret Godfrey Vice President 

Annie Battle Miller Secretary and Treasurer 

Mary Harris Cheer Leader 

Elizabeth Platt Assistant Cheer Leader 

I km a Edmonson Manager Basketball 

Virginia Evans Manager Volley Ball 

Sarah Tomlinson Manager Track 

Caroline Tucker Manager Tennis 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

Miss Alexander Miss Bason Mrs. Simuolottt 

Miss Davis Miss Ruef Miss Thornton 

Mrs. Marriott Miss Riley Mrs. Weedon 

Miss Shapcott 

ROLL 

Aiken, P. Elmore, .f. Lee, M. Pritchett, K. 

Allen, L. Evans, V. Leinster, S. Purringtox, K. 

Allen, M. Evins, S. Lyon. K. Reid. M. 

Badham, H. Fox jJj Marks, C. Reeves, L. 

Btjrrage, N. Freeman A Marriner, F. Rose, M. 

Butler, E. Galloway, M. Martin, G. Sansbury. F. 

Cameron. M. Garrktt M. Matthews, F. Scales. L. 

Carmichaei., A. Glenn R Men/.ies, V. Shelton. A. P. 

Cason, A. Godfrey, M. Meroney, T. Shore, C. 

Cauthen, F. G-rekn E. Miller. A. B. Shore. F. 

Chance, M. Gregory, E Morley, O. Sinsabaugh, L. 

Clark. R. Hardin M. Montgomery, M. smith. L. 

Clarkson, M. Haroing, P. Muse, M. Stalijngs, M. 

Clendenin, 1). Harris, M. Oestmann. M. Strickland. E. 

Crocker, B. Hazmll, N. '»RR. C. Talkkrt. E. 

Crudup, L. Hines, E. Parrish, M. C. Tkubiiah, M. 

Crudup, M. Hollowell. M. Pai l. V. Tomlinson, S. 

Tkotman. M. S. 

Dewar, A. Hoover, m. Peniok, m. 

m Trotter. J. 

DIAL, B. H..YT. B. PKBRY, T. ^^ ,. 

Doar, S. Hubbard, C. Philips, B. R. Tuckeb S 

Doar, H. HuiE, M. Pickett. E. Van* e. F. 

Dorsett, M. Jones, M. Pitts, C. Williams. E. 

Dunlop, M. Kramer, E. Platt. A. Wilson, M. 

Edmonson, I. Lawtox, C. Platt. k. Worth, E. 












One Hundred Forty-uix 





^ ^pgj ^g^ 




One Hundred F»rty-#ewn 









I 










First Team 




Forwards — 


Guards — 


Godfrey, M. 


Allen, L. 


Edmondson, I. Capt. 


Cruduf, L. 


Centers — 




DOAB, S. 




Wolfe, H. 








' 'V 












V 



Oni> Jftnulivjl Forty eight 





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U^TvV 




U *^HS 






W' ~~ ^H 






k. C 


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i 


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HHi 




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9 



Second Team 
Forwards — Guards — 

Thtjkman, M. Carmichael, A. 

Evans, V. Copt. Cbddup, M. 

Centers — 

WlIXIAMB, E. 

Jones, M. 




Third Team 

For wards— a u a rds—^- 

Tomlinson, S. Clarksox, M. 

Tucker, C. Capt. Sheltox, A. P. 

Centers — 

Galloway. M. 
Lawton, C. 



- i; ,r 










^—Qn<? ITiiiuJrril FortH-nitlR 





Sigma First Team — Volley Ball 



Caroline Tucker 
Louise Scales 
Sallie Doak 
Martha Jones 



Caroline Lawton 
Virginia Evans 
Mary Thirman 
Sara To.mlixson 





■SzM 


\:'^'.^mj)h 


- 



Sigma Second Team — Volley Ball 



Alice Cason 
Fannie Aiken 
Martha Crudup 
Irma Edmonson 



Louise Allen 
Margaret Rose 
Virginia NORTON 
Elizabeth Platt 






One Hundred Fifty 




STAC 



£ 




SIGMAS 





CHEER LEADER ALLEN CHEER LEADER 

PRESIDENT 





i 




.MANAGERS 






One Hundred Fifty-one 



Mus 1925-26 



ill 



Colors: Blue and White 

OFFICERS 

Mela Roy all President 

Lelia Cameron Vice President 

Margaret Bullitt Secretary and Treasurer 

Trynt.ie Swartwood Cheer Leader 

Martha Thigpen Assistant Cheer Leader 

Ada Montgomery Manager Basketball 

Peggy Burckmyer Manager Volley Ball 

Dor.sey Bruen Manager Track 

Maisie Smith Manager Tennis 

FACULTY MEMBE'RS 

Miss Bell Miss Ckofi't Miss Sutton 

Miss Cooke Miss Herring Miss Turner 

Miss Fenner Miss Lee Mr. Jones 

Miss Grant Miss McKimmon Miss Cohb 

Miss Monroe 

ROLL 

Andrus, H. Freeman, B. Lawrence. A. Stewart. ft. 

Austen, M. Fulenwider. M, Lee, L. Sublett, N. 

Barber, E. Gaulding, E. Lester, M. Stratton. L. 

Barden, E. Griffith, D. Marshall, E. Swartwood, T. 

Barker, E. Giddens, E. May, K. Swift. L. 

Battle, J. Griffith, J. Messick, T. Taylor, V. 

Benton. A. Hancock, S. Montgomery, A. Thum-en, M. 

Broadhurst, J. Hardesty, K. McCuen, .7. Thornton, E. 

Brown, F. Harris. E. Nicolson, M. Towers, A. 

Bruen, D. Harrison. L. Noble, S. TmvNSENn, A. 

Bryant. N, Hathaway, C. Owens, L. Townsent>. L. 

Bullitt, M. Hayne, S. Parrott, X. Turner, E. 

Burckmyer, M. Hicks, J. Paul, Y. Turner, M. 

Bynum, N. Hooker, P. Peal, X. Uzzle. F. 

Cameron. L. Hornk, M. Pendleton, S. Vick, F. 

Carlton, M. Hosmer. K. Poe. M. \V\ddell R 

Cummins, T. Hunter, M. Rrid, A. \v u i D 

Curry. S. Jackson* , A. Rhea. M. " 

Dando, G. Johnson, E. Rodman. O. 

Dayenport. V. Johnston, A. G. Royall, M. Williams. J. 

Dk'kkrson, M. Jolly, S. Seeley. A. V\ ii.lis. M. 

Dougherty, I>. Jones, E. Shelton, E. Womble, S. 

Fletcher. G. Kitchin, M. Smith, .T. Yates, E. 

Fray, L. Lancaster, S. Smith, M. York, M. 






One Bitmlrt'tl Fifty-two 







> i «'y<i ■„ rc»n i 



_.Ojiih~ffv)uT.red Fifty-three 




Mu 



First Team 



Fonvards- 



Weaver. M. Capt. 
Cameron. L. 



Guards — 

Bbuen, D. 

ROYAT.I.. M. 



Centers — 

Gaulding, E. G. 

Towxsexd. L. 



One Hundred Fifty-four 





STAGE CO ACI- 






















*■ ■•"■ 






r 












'■ 1 


JHga 




jjBjW|j^ 


4BH 


.!5i^ a ^ 








'"-•-- : 












^^^ *^^B 




f r H 
















^1 












■ a 


[ 









Second Team 






'onrards — - 


Guards — 




Johnston, A. G. 


Montgomery, 


A 


Stewart, D. 


Jackson, A. 




Centers — ■ 






Bardin, E. 






Davis. M. 








Third Team 

Forwards — Guards — 

SlIEl.TON, E. Makshall, E 

Thigpen, M. Williams, J. 

Centers — 

Owens, L. 
Godley, N. 









One Hundred Fifty-five 




Mil Firs! Team — Volley Bail 



Lena Swift 
Dorsey Bruen 
Biu.y Prekman 
Ella Grey Gaut.mnc 



Mary Davis 
Tkynt.ik Swartwooti 
Eliza Barihn 
Peggy Burckmyeh 




! 



i 



Mu Second Te 

Mela Royai.i. 
Ada Montgomery 
Margaret Carlton 
Ki.okkxck Barkley 



-Volley Ball 

Mildred Weaver 
Ann" Lawrence 
Martha Tit.lkry 

LiUCILLK TilWNSKXli 



One Sundred Fl/ly-iB 



THUS 



si 





CHEERLEADER ROYALL CHEERLEADER 
PRESIDENT 




MANAGERS 



^jjjit^-lliiixln-d Fifty-seven 




i 
- 









Athletic Schedule 



October 3 Bloomer Party 

November 16 Track Meet 

November 21 Basketball, First Team 

Sigma 21; Mu 43 

November 23 Fox and Hound Chase 

November 28 Basketball, First Team 

Sigma 31; Mu 45 

December 12 Basketball, First Team 

Sigma 46; Mu 51 

January 16 Basketball, Second Team 

Sigma 26; Mu 41 

January 30 Basketball, Second and Third 

Sigma 27-27; Mu 25-29 

February 20 Basketball, Second and Third 

Sigma 21-25; Mu 34-19 

February 22 Basketball, Third Team 

Sigma 23; Mu 16 

March 20 ' Volley Ball, First and Second 

March 27 Volley Ball, First and Second 

March 29 Volley Ball, First and Second 

April 17 Gymnastic Tournament 



Teams 

Teams 



Teams 
Teams 
Teams 



One Hundred Fifty-eight 




Sikma Track Tkaii 







Mu Songs and Yells Sigma Songs and Yells 



MU that's the way to spell it, 
Ray Mu! That's the way to yell ill 
' Team! Team! Team! 












villi nil our 



The Mu Team will win ami we'll 

might — 
We'll win tonight and we'll make those Sigmas 

fight. 
We've got the rep. and by gosh, we've gut the 

pep; 
We'll beat 'em up and we'll fight, fight, fight, 

fight. 
lln with the Mu Team and help beat 'era up. 
We've got the team, and by gosh, we've got the 

luck, 
And so in this manner, we'll win the banner. 

Rah! Rah I The ole Mu Team! 



Had a little Rooster, 

Set him on the fence. 

He crowed for the Mu Teai 

'Cause he had good sense I 



With colors in triumph flashing 

'Mid the strains of victory, 
Poor Sigma's hopes we're dashing 

Into red obscurity. 
Resistless our team sweeps goalward 

With the fury of our might. 
We'll tight for the name of Mu Team 

Till we win the game tonight. 



Hobble, Gobble, 
Razzle, Dazzle. 
Sis-Boom— Bah! 
Mu Team! 
Mu Team! 
Rah! Rah I Rah I 

Ride on 'em, 
Slide on 'em, 
Skate on 'em too. 
Mu Team! Mu Team! 
Good for you! 





The 

A 

We 

And 



i the field, on the floor, 
dear Mus will always score, 
i The Mu Team goes rolling along. 
will fight with our might, 
'twill he a pretty sight. 
i the Mu Team goes rolling along 

Then it's hi! hi! heel 

In the field of victory. 

Shout out your praises loud and strong, 

Wliere're you go, yon will always know 

That tin- Mu Team goes rolling along! 

That the Mu Team goes rolling along! 



Rayl Ray! Row! Row! 
Sigmas, show 'em how I 

For when the good ole Sigma 6 fall in line. 
We're going to win the game another time. 
We'll pill a bright red banner on the wall, 
For the Sigma girls can surely play basketball. 
We've got the forwards, guards and renters, tu<>- 
And we'll surely make those Mas look blue — 
Mus look blue. 

Come, on Sigoias. win the game, win the game— 
Goodnight, Mus I 

Horse and wagon, horse and wagon — 

Team! Team! Team! 
Locomotive, Locomotive — 

Coach! Coach! Coach! 

(Tune of Nancy Lee) 
of all Hie girls as e're you know, 
Yeho, Sigma Ho, Yeho, Sigma, Ho I 
There's none like Sigma girls, I trow, 
Yeho! Yeho! Yeho! 



.lust watch em get the ball and send it down the 

court, 
And everj time the Mus advance they stop them 

short, 
And swiftly to the very end the game is fought. 

y.ehol Sigm; L Ho! Yehol 

Chorus: 

The Red and White will wave all glorious. 

Yeho! Yeho! Yeho ! Yeho! 
The Siirma Team will be victorious. 

Come on, Sigmas, win tonight! 

Say I 

Say what? 

That's what! 

What's what? 

That's what they all say! 

What's what they all say! 

Beat the Mus! 

Beat the Mus! 

Sigma Fight Song 
Girls in red and white we're behind you. 
Come on Sigmas. teach them to play hall. 
All the time, girls, never let them find you, 
Pont let them score at all 1 
We're bound to win, so pass it down 
The court and score, girls, 
Buck them with all your might, 

Jump in and get that ball, 

Don't ever let it fall. 

Cnme on. Sigmas. win the game 

And Fight! Sigmas! Fight! 
Chorus; 

Fight. Fight. Fight! till the last free throw is made. 
Send that ball down the court, it's a goal. 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Fight, fight, fight, rush along on the fray. 
Drop the ball riiht through that hole. 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Conic on. Sigmas, you old red and white. 
We trust in our team always. 
So play your basketball 
For the Sigma girls, that's all. 
And bring home a win tonight! 
Sigmas! Fight I 






One Hundred S<xty 




Mu and Sigma Tennis 




r Ilitndrrd Sixty-one 



One Ilinidr 



raffi 




()„,■ Uiimlr 




*•&£> ■■ 



One Ilundvril Sixty-three 






Statistics 

Versatility ....Mela Allen Kdyall 

Influence Ruth Loaring Class 

Popularity Mary Mabgabet Muse 

Wisdom Mabgabet Randolph Bullitt 

Grace Elizabeth Randolph Green 

Dancing Grace Martin and Dorothy Griffith 

Charm Olivia Mobley 

Attractiveness Katherine Lyon 

Athletics Dorsey Brien 

Wit Maby Mask abet Mi se 

Style Louise Terrell Allen 

Efficiency Sylbert Pendleton 






One aundreU Sixtff^attr 




VERSATILITY 




STYLE 




INFLUENCE 




EFFICIENCY 




ATTRACTIVENESS 




DANCING 




WISDOM 




POPULARITY AND WIT 




ATHLETICS 




CHARM 




GRACE 















Statistics 



Seconds 




ATTRACTIVENESS WISDOM- CHARM 
POPULARITY 



INFLUENCE 




VERSATILITY 



V- 



ATHLETICS 





GRACE 






One Hundred Seventy-six 













One Hundred Seventy-seven 

- 









vs 





Minuet 1926 



LADIES 
Betty Green 
Martha Thigpen 
Sally Leinster 
Margaret Bullitt 
Margaret Ellen Lester 
Virginia Menzies 
Olivia Mobley 
Marion Lee 



GENTLEMEN 
Mary Davis 
Elizabeth Platt 
Louise Allen 
Grace Martin 
Celeste Hubbard 
Elizabeth Marshall 
Saija Tomlinson 
Mary Harris 



One Hundred SBvenly-eight 







One Hundred Seventy-nine 



Justice 



Every morning after chapel, 
Ere to classes we depart 
"Come to my room after luncheon," 
Is a phrase that makes ns start. 

Then a list of names is read out 
Calling us before the judge. 
Tho' our lines to us seem sinless. 
To the office we must trudge. 

There to answer, though we'd rather 
That she didn't ask us so — 
Searching questions — such a bother 
Then to study hall we go. 



It has often seemed unfair to us 
That we are always made to pay, 
For offences no more awful. 
Than our teachers do all day. 

They are never called to judgment 
For the naughty things they do; 
And we think that our dear teachers, 
Ought to pay for their fun too. 

Some day there'll be a reckoning 
When they'll get what they deserve. 
But as that day seems far away, 
We hope our little page will serve — a 
warning to them. 



Reports that might have been, with suggested vengeance 

VENGEANCE 
Indefinite afternoon study hall. 






REPORTS 

1. Miss Davis — late for breakfast. 

2. Miss Cobb — disturbing four Seniors 

at three a.m. 
:5. Miss Turner — creating a disturbance 
in study hall. 

4. Miss Herring — attending a midnight 

feast. 

5. Miss Ruef— playing cards— in French 

class. 

6. Miss Fenner— perfuming West Rock 

with onions. 

7. Mr. Stone— disturbing Pendleton's 

nap on history. 

8. Miss Grant— disturbing Senior Hall 

at 2 a.m. 
!). Miss "Bell"— annoying faculty, of- 
ficers and students at all hours 
and half hours. 

10. Mr. Way— talking to Miss Crofut in 

Chapel. 

11. Miss Monroe— returning late after 

holidays, second offense. 

12. Miss Bason — room out of order. 

13. Miss Lee — Failing to start to break- 

fast at 7:25^ 



Sound sleep for one month. 

Retire at S p.m. until after May 2S. 

Return cash for value of food demolished. 

Don't shuffle cards! 

Invite certain Seniors to the party. 

Pass her on the same! 

Get a pass key. 

Cease ringing! 

Go to A N V I K. 

Do it again (vote of Math. Ml. 
Spend Friday in Senior Hall. 

Go to study hall for all tardy Seniors. 






V 



One Hundred Eighty 




One Uvndrltl Biahlytwo 










We 


\TI] Kit 


REr 


ORT 


Pa i 

We 


. CfllTJ 

r slick 


uml 
ersl 


rellas. 



STAGE STRUCK 



June, 192G 



COSTS NOTHING 



WORTH ALL IT COSTS! 



ROMANCE' PERISHES 

Mischief was Bruen on 
the Shore of the Swift St. 
Lawrence. It was Paul's 
Chance to prove his Worth, 
and the Noble boy Rose 
from the Glenn where he 
was Lyon and rushed into 
the Fray amidst the Bul- 
lilts. After the Battle he 
returned to Toicnsend his 
Love. Hazell. She was 
waiting by the Gates in the 
old Stone Wall. "I am 
Aiken for you," he said, 
and his eyes grew Fulen- 
wider. "Be my Storr. We 
May find a house to Sub- 
let!, a Garrett and a 
Kitchin would be Jolly 
with you." "You need more 
Jack-son," she Mused. "No 
fficfcs for me, there's the 
Doar." 



A Jewish Rabbi and a 
Roman Catholic Priest 
were dining together — The 
Priest in an attempt to be 
clever kept offering the 
Rabbi some roast pork. 
Finally, becoming right- 
eously indignant but with 
a twinkle in his eye, the 
Rabbi turned to the Priest 
and said— "My friend I'll 
be only too glad to eat 
roast pork at your wedding 
breakfast." 



SEARCH CONTINUES 

GIRLS IN PURSUIT 

The search for knowl- 
edge which has been dili- 
gently carried out else- 
where is being faithfully 
pursued by one hundred 
and sixty-five girls at St. 
Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C. Many of the girls 
were interviewed and all 
report the search as ex- 
ceedingly dull, interest in- 
creases around the 20th of 
January and May and 
wanes around Christmas 
and the Ides of March so 
the girls say. The Senior 
Class believe they have 
nearly succeeded in the 
search, most of them re- 
porting that they intend to 
discontinue it the first of 
June. A few plan, how- 
ever, to search and re- 
search. 

Friends and alumna; will 
be glad to learn that wood- 
en walks will soon be 
placed all over the Campus 
leading to the various 
buildings. Isn't it nice 
that the faculty members 
are putting their heads to- 
gether on something? 



"SHOCKING"! SAYS 
DEAN 
Wir.r. Peevknt Charleston 
The Dean of St. Mary's 
School spoke forcibly this 
morning on the subject of 
St. Mary's girls dancing 
the Charleston. Losing 
their dignity and several 
pounds. Drastic methods 
have been taken to prevent 
any recurrence of the 
Charleston in the school 
parlors; such methods 
were necessary for the 
morals of the girls as well 
as the pictures on the 
walls. The Dean further 
added that two girls had 
been seen with ear-rings 
on. The severity of her 
tone and her seeming dis- 
pleasure served to impress 
the girls that young ladies 
neither Charleston nor 
wear ear-rings. "Would 
you chew gum or roll your 
hose?" asked the Dean in 
conclusion. 



Slightly inebriate gentle- 
man to a hurried traveler 
just entering the railroad 
station — "Hick — are you 
looking for the train?" 

Gentleman — "Yes, where 
is it? 

I. G. "It's gone — don't 
you see its tracks?" 



One- Hundred Ehibhi-lh, 







U. Knowni-:, Editor 



Published Spasmodically 



Entered at the P. O. as no matter 



DAILY PILLS 

OF WISDOM 

Laugh and the world 
laughs with you ; weep and 
you look like 

A stitch in time saves a 
new pair of stockings. 

'Tis better to have loved 
and lost, than talk to boys 
in the California. 

Yesterday's issue con- 
tained a gross misprint — 
"Mr. Jones kisses lasses" 
was the way it appeared. 
"Mr. Jones misses classes' 
is what it should have 
been. The type setter's 
mind was evidently on 
other things — namely, 
"lasses." We are glad to 
remedy this mistake. 






CHEMISTRY F 
It seemed the will of fate 
To Miss Grant a class of 

eight. 

II 
One did not know yeast to 

be leaven 
That left a class of only 

seven. 

Ill 
Too much work got one in 

a fix, 
Now the class numbers 

only six. 
IV 
One fell down the steps in 

the hall. 
In the class now five in all. 

V 
One decided to work no 

more 
Now there remains to us 

only four! 
VI 
One was forced from school 

to flee, 
So you see there are now 

.just three. 
VII 
One then to a husband flew 
So to meet exams there 

are only two. 
VIII 
Oh! almost invisible class. 
Lose not from thee another 

lass. 
Lest from this class grown 

so few 
The teacher discouraged 

vanish too! 



WITHOUT RHYME' 

NOR REASON 

He asked me if I necked. 

I said him nay. 

He tried to kiss me. 

I drew away. 

He said that I was pretty. 

I said he lied. 

And laughter, smiles and 
joking 

True feeling hide. 

For tho' his talk was but 
a line 

And all untrue, 

I'd love to have had him 
kiss me 

And love me too. 

And — since I drew away 

I was a fool. 

To seem what I am not 

Was e'er my rule. 

Yet — heavens above! 

What was I but — 

A girl in love. 



One Hundred Ei'jhhi-four 








& 






rjm/ Einhlil-liec 



True Stories 




Once long ago, I did my wickedest deed. I went to 
market and bought a pencil from a blind beggar and put a 
nickel in the cup. Suddenly it looked to me that the beggar 
bad an awful pile of money so I took out a "quarter — and 
immediately spent it in riotous liying. My richness aroused 
Mother's suspicion so she inquired and inquired until in 
tears I confessed. So the next market day yery humbly 
indeed I went to the blind man and returned to him (accord- 
ing to' orders) two quarters taken out of my sayings bank. 
I humbly apologized but the blind man snatched the quarters 
and said — "You nasty little thief 1" 

So this is my wickedest deed — so wicked I 

— Fir*t "Legendary Hero." 




II 

Teacher was at the blackboard and on a certain bench 
three little maids were, apparently, deeply absorbed in their 
lessons. 

Suddenly a little green snake wriggled across the floor. 
Life took' on fresh interest. Would it break into pieces 
if you hit it. and every piece make another snake? 

Whack I A book f ell 1 But alas, not upon the snake. 
Over went, the bench! Wriggle went the snake— right over 
teacher's footl A scream! And desk, chalk, ink nntl 
teacher .ioined the snake on the floor. 

Three little maids, catching a glance full of abhorence 
from the teacher, followed the fast disappearing serpent, 
staying not upon the order of their going, but going at once 
and swiftly. 

An( l so — I, one of the little maids, ran away from school, 
and the sequel I shan't tell! _„^ ^^ ^ „ 




those 



To one who can say most fervently that he has "done 
things that he ought not to have done, it is 



of difficult" to decide upon the meanest thing he has ever 
done. I ' recall however one event which has always 



done. 

remained in my mind. 

I was returning from a walk in the fields, where I had 
captured a nest of mice for our kitten. But alas, for the 
kittenl Mv path ran by the church, and while passing I 
was seized 'with the desire to see how mice act in church. 
One bv one I let them enter — one by one the prim ladies 
climbed horrified on the pews. I fee! sure the mice annoyed 
the congregation, but— the small boy concerned enjoys review- 
ing this wicked deed of his boyhood. 

— "The Wizard o/ Oi.'' 



Our Htntilrrtl Ki'ihhi-iix 



STAGE 






A WARNING TO WAKEFUL SENIORS 

One night in September when I was eight 

I had a guest for the night, 

Eliza — Then tame the idea great 

Of staying awake alt night. 

We lay and plotted ; the dock struck ten 
And all the house was still; 
E'en colored Ann, our guard just then, 
Was snoring loud and shrill. 

The clock struck 'leven. In the bright moonlight 

Two pails stood in our way; 

With water full we tilled them — then right 

To Ann without delay. 

We dropped some drops upon Ann's face; 
She started from her slumber. 
Upright she kneeled with sudden grace 
And prayed in tones of thunder I 

Up went our pails; the water fell 

In torrents on her pig's tail; 

She gave a leap; she gave a yell 

And roused the house to bear her wail. 

— "Our Mutual Fi 



Censored 

by 

Miss Turner 

^The Carolinian 




If I were to tell the wickedest thing I ever did I should 
a tale unfold thai would make each of your particular hairs 
stand on end. This I could not (In. as my New England 
conscience will not allow me knowingly corrupt the morals 



relate an episode that 
may befall her who is 

approximate age of five 

randfather. We children 

goat and her kid were 



of the young. So I shall merely 
teaches the awful vengeance that 
guilty of the sin of teasing. 

Once, when I bad reached the 
years, my family went to visit my L 
swarmed to the backyard where a 

tied. We petted the kid. but were wise enough and aggravat- 
ing enough to keep ,iust beyond the goat's reach. 

Becoming very absorbed, it was some minutes before I 
noticed that all had become deathly quiet. I discovered to 
my horror that the tie-rope had broken and that the gout 
and I alone held the field. There was a small space be- 
tween the two wide boards of the fence. I sped for this.- 
So did the goat. I plainly recall stooping down to crawl 
through the opening but I never have remembered going 
through. The goat attended to that and I landed in a held 
several feet beyond the fence. 

Somehow I never have cared much for goats. 



Onr Huiiilrrd Ei0it]/-8 




r<^&?5 



Zb &a?2>r&icca£ ~ 



One Hunthal Eitihtjhchjbl 




QJ 



Advertisements 



WHEN IN TOWN SEE THESE 
V. V. Mobley in "Sunny." 
Lib Thornton in "Stage Struck." 
Dot Wall in "Flaming Youth. " 
V. Menzies in "Why Boys leave Home." 
Dot Griffith in "The Dancing Fool." 
Vivian Davenport in "So Big." 
Phylis, the waitress in "The Dark Angel." 
Bible N. Students in "His Hour." 
The Annual Staff in "Money, Money, Money." 

BY THEIR SLOGANS YOU SHALL KNOW THEM 
"They satisfy" — Grades above 70. 

"I'd walk a mile" for an excuse to leave the campus. 

"Conies out like a ribbon, lies flat on the brush" — Any one from exams. 
"What a whale of a difference a Jew cents makes" — Without that bottle of Listerine. 
"Eventually why not now" — That report to Miss Alberson. 
"Ask the man who owns one" — A date card. 
"57 varieties" — Excuses to get out. 
"We strive to please" — St. Mary's Girls. 
"Four out of Five have it" — That insatiable appetite. 
"The skin you love to touch" — Sheep Skin. 

LOST AND FOUND— IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE 

Found — One A. T. O. pin Frances Vick, Vick may procure same by giving name and 
address of original owner of the pin. 

Lost — One "Human Body" if found return to Miss Riley! 

LoHt — One "Cross" return to the library if found for Miss Turner will be very cross if 
"Cross" is not returned. 

Notice — We will exchange ten acres of beautiful campus, slightly worn for one block 
on Fayetteville Street, preferably near the California — St. Mary's. 

For ,S'«7r — One badly abused ukelele belonging to Margaret S. Rose — Apply to any Senior 
in East Rock. 




One Hundred E 



liolttji-niiic 




School Calendar 



Saturday. 
Saturday, 



SEPTEMBER 
Monday, 14. Faculty assemble. 

Tuesday-Wednesday, 15-16. Opening days of the Eighty-fourth Annual Session; arrival 
of the new girls, Tuesday; return of the old girls, Wednesday. 

Reception of old girls to new girls in the "Parlor." 

Reception given by Sigma Lambdas and E. A. P.'s to new members in 
the "Parlor." 

OCTOBER 
Thursday, 1. Faaulty Reception. 

Saturday, 3. Bloomer Party in gym — Mus victorious 

Wednesday-Thursday, 14-15. Holidays; State Fair; Carolina-N. C. State Football game; 
Al. G. Field's Minstrels at the State Theatre. 

Tuesday, 20. First Womans' Club Concert. 

Wednesday, 21. U. S. Navy Band at the Auditorium. 

Saturday, 31. Hallowe'en Party in gym. 



19. 
26. 



NOVEMBER 
Founder's Day. 



Founder's Day Program in the 



and Preps in the "Parlor," 



Sunday, 1. All Saint's Day. 

"Parlor." 

Tuesday. 10. Second Womans' Club Concert. 

Thursday, 12. Student's Recital in the Auditorium. 

Friday. 13. Miss Albertson's Tea. 

Saturday, 14. Class Parties; Seniors to Sophomores 
Juniors to Freshman in the gym. 

Monday 1G. Track Meet, 3 p.m. 

Saturday, 21. Basketball game. First teams. 

Monday, 23. Faculty Recital in the Auditorium. 

DECEMBER 

Thursday, 3. Third Woman's Club concert. 

Friday, 4. Miss Albertson's tea to the Juniors. 

Tuesday. S. Sigma Lambda model meeting in the "Parlor." 

Thursday, 10. Students' music recital; E. A. P. model meeting in the "Parlor. 

Friday, 11. Junior fashion show in the "Parlor." 

Saturday, 12. Basketball game, first teams. 

Monday, 14. Dramatic Club; Plays in the Auditorium. 

Thursday, 17. Senior Christmas play. 

JANUARY 
Wednesday, 6. Return of students after Christmas holidays. 
Sunday, 10. Glee Club carol service in the Chapel. 
Saturday, 16. Basketball game, second teams. 



One Hundred Xinety 






STAGE C< 







Monday, 


1. 


Saturday, 


6. 


Tuesday, 


9. 


Thursday, 


11. 


Saturday, 


13. 


Monday, 


15. 


Tuesday, 


16. 


Wednesday 


, 17. 


Thursday, 


IS. 


Saturday, 


20. 


Monday, 


22. 


Thursday, 


25. 


Sunday, 


28. 



Monday, 25. Miss Crofut's recital in the Auditorium. 
Saturday, 3. Basketball games, second and third teams. 

FEBRUARY 
Dr. Collier Cobb of Chapel Hill lectures on "Japan." 
Return class party. 

Miss Albertson's tea to the Freshmen and Preps. 
Sewanee Glee Club in the Auditorium. 
Sketch Club tea in the Art Studio. 
Miss Bell's recital in the Auditorium. 
Colonial ball. 

Ash Wednesday. Special services in the Chapel. 
Students' music recital. 

Basketball games, second and third teams. 
Basketball game, third teams. 

Dr. Smith of N.C.C.W. lectures on "Rudyard Kipling" in the Auditorium. 
Miss Fenner's lecture on "Sculpture." 

MARCH 
Monday, 1. Basketball game, third teams. 

Friday, 5. Fourth Woman's Club concert. 

Thursday, 11-Tuesday 17. Spring holidays. 
Saturday, 20. Volley Ball game. 

Inter-society debate. 

Miss Fenner's lecture on "Paintings." 

Volley Ball game. 

APRIL 
Good Friday. 
Easter Day. 

Fifth Woman's Club concert. 
Gym. tournament. 

MAY 

May Day. 

Swimming meet. 
Wednesday, 12. Alumna? Day. Eighty-fourth anniversary of founding of St. Mary's. 
Saturday, 15. Junior-Senior banquet. 
Monday, 17. School Picnic. 
Saturday, 22. School party in the "Parlor." 
Saturday, 29. Commencement play. 



Saturday, 


27. 


Sunday, 


28. 


Monday, 


29. 


Friday, 


2 


Sunday, 


4. 


Monday, 


12. 


Saturday, 


17. 


Saturday, 


1. 


Monday, 


10. 



One Hundred Ninety-one 






Ac know ledgm ent 



TT was Mr. Way, Miss Alberston. Miss Katie and Miss Sutton who made the 
■*- Stage Coach possible. It was Miss Turner's encouragement and never- 
ceasing interest and guidance, and Mr. Tucker's smiling assistance at all times 
that made the possibility become a working probability. Miss Houclien, Mrs. 
Marriott, the Senior Class, the art students, typists, and, above all, Mr. Beck of 
Edwards & Broughton, have helped work the probability into the actuality we now 
present. 

Though all the Seniors have been faithful in general work, we wish especially 
to mention a few of them — Frances Salisbury, who kindly catalogued the events 
of the year; Ann Lawrence and Ruth Loaring Clark, for the time spent in taking 
snapshots and collecting jokes. Cleave Shore and Frances Salisbury should be 
duly acknowledged for the many hours spent on "general work." For art work, 
especially, and many additions to the "Stage Struck" section, we have Margaret 
Wilson to thank. Alicia Piatt and Miss Grant have contributed delightful "anony- 
mous" poetry. 

This year we have Miss Fenner to thank, not only for her help as instructor of 
the art staff, but for her personal contribution to the Stage Coach. 

We appreciate the interest shown by our advertisers and trust the results will 
justify their patronage. We hardly know how to express our sincere apprecia- 
tion to Mr. Beck.. He has shown such a distinct personal interest in all that 
concerns the Stage Coach. Suffice it to say that his capable direction of our 
ideas and generous contribution of his own have made our work on the Stage 
Coach a pleasure. 



One Hundred Ninety-two 



RALEIGH MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION 



'^J HE following pages of advertising 
\mJ have been placed in the annual by 
the various merchants of Raleigh in the 
hope of not merely individual gain, but in 
the realization that a greater cooperative 
spirit in all tilings pertaining to Raleigh 
enterprises will be fruitful of better things 
both for the student bodies and the Raleigh 
Merchants. 

We hope that while you peruse these pages 
you will realize that the Raleigh Merchants 
Association and its members appreciate 
fully the good will of each student in this 
college. 



C. C. GUNN 
A. M. BECK N. H. McLEOD 

Good Will Committee 



RALEIGH MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION 



TAYLOR'S 

The Show Place of the Carolinas 



WE WILL AND DO SELL YOU BETTER GOODS 
FOR THE SAME MONEY 



FURS 



Coats 


Underwear 


Novelties 


Millinery 


Neckwear 
JEWELRY 


Sportwear 



TAYLOR'S 

The Show Place of the Carolinas 



WE WILL AND DO SELL YOU BETTER GOODS 
FOR THE SAME MONEY 



FURS 



Dresses Gloves Sweaters 

Suits Hosiery Skirts 



JEWELRY 



The 


Ladies' Shop 


Fine Millinery 


14 East Hargett Street 


Popular Prices 




Young Man at Banquet: I like 


Royster's 


any kind of wild game, don't you? 




V. Peal: Yes, do vou happen 


FINE CANDIES 


to know any? 


Almost as Old as 


M. Weaver: It certainly is in 


Saint Mary's Itself 


Vogue. 




"Lib" Marshall: I am sure I 




saw it in Vanity Fair. 



California Fruit Store 

"Caterers to Saint Mary's for 26 Years" 



EFFICIENT SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE 
MODERNLY EQUIPPED LUNCHEONETTE 
DELICIOUS HOME MADE CANDIES 






PHONE 36 
111 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Alderman & Co. 

We Handle Only the Best 
in 

Candies 

also 

National Biscuit Cakes 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Polly: Have you seen the 
"Thief of Bagdad?" 

Parrot: No, is something 

tni«*in or? 



Madame Simbolotti: What 
mood is that verb in? 

Jonnie Muse: Indicative, I 
guess. 

Madam Sim: No, try again, I'll 
give you three guesses. 

Jonnie: Maybe its Subjunctive. 

Madam Sim I astounded I : That's 
not fair, some one must have told 
you. 



RALEIGH'S ORIGINAL SOURCE OF 
SMART APPAREL 



Raleigh's 

Smartest 

Shop 



lE UISBERfc j 



126 

Fayetteville St. 
Raleigh, N .C. 



College Girls naturally gravitate to this store 
lured by the exquisite 

Coats : Frocks : Millinery : Suits and Wraps 

That make this store irresistible to the smart dressers 
To. suit your individual requirements 



College Students 

ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT OUR STORE 

Leaders in All High Grade Toilet Goods 
Try Us First 

Agents for Hollingsworth Fine Candies 

Boon-Iseley Drug Company 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Lester Engraving Company 

O. A. LESTER, Proprietor 
FayetleviUe Street Raleigh, N. C. 



EAT AT 

Vurnaki 



' rnaKes 

THE PLACE WHERE YOUTH MEETS 

Fayetteville Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



SEE 

Graham's 

FOR 

Stationery and Magazines 

FayetteriUe Street 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



WE ARE FOR 



Saint Mary's 



EDWARDS-CAIN DRUG CO. 



Two Squares from the Campus 



An Invitation 



To a new, enchanting land where every woman may revel to 
her heart's content among the most alluring of fashions — fashions 
that are a credit to her good taste as well as ours. 

An exhibition of all that's new in Ladies' Wear awaits you. 
Apparel and accessories of beauty and charm; easy to look upon, 
easy to wear, and easy to choose. 

Come in! You will not be urged to buy. 



Boylan-Pearce Co. 

"Raleigh's Shopping Center" 



CONFIDENCE 



The young ladies of Saint Mary's who are sensi- 
tive to quality appeal and those who instinctively 
buy where complete confidence may be placed are 
among our most welcome customers. 

It is ever the policy of this Company to continue 
to merit such confidence by constant attention to 
the proper relation of quality and price. 



Boylan-Pearce Co. 

"Raleigh's Shopping Center" 



Brantley's Drug Store 

The Place to Meet Your Friends 
Agent for "ELIZABETH ARDEN" 

Our 

SODAS AND ICE CREAMS 

Are Always Best 

Telephones 14 and 15 Raleigh, N. C. 



DIRGE 

The teacher has dismissed the class 
And I must go and polish brass. 
Ann Lawrence did this thing to me 
She put me on this committee. 
But while in church I scrape and skin 
The brass, may I o'ercome my sin, 
And in my heart forgiveness find 
For her who meant not t'be unkind. 
And 1 my task will never shirk 
And often think the while I work 
How very happy I should be 
For this help on my pedigree! 

M. D. J., '26. 



Horton's Studio 



MASONIC 
TEMPLE 
BUILDING 



THE VERY BEST IN 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

FOR 

The Stage Coach 



EXCLUSIVE BUT NOT EXPENSIVE 



STYLISH— YOUTHFUL 
APPAREL 

FOR THE 

COLLEGE MISS 

AND 

JUNIOR WOMEN 

HOSIERY. GLOVES AND 

OTHER ACCESSORIES 

All of Substantial Quality — 
Exclusive but not expensive 



RALEIGH'S LEADING 
BEAUTY SHOP 

Presided over by Mrs. Stubblefield 

Beauty Expert of Many Years Experi- 
ence and Careful Training 

Hair Bobrinc in the Latest Styles 
Marcel and Permanent Waving 

MANICURING AND 
BEAUTY CULTURE AND CARE 

Special Thursdays we give our regular 
Facials lor S1.00 
Mezzanine Floor 




Fayetteville St. 



Phones 704 and 705 



Raleigh, N. C. 



WHEN IN NEED 
OF ANYTHING 
Electrical 

Call to See Our Complete Line 
Demonstration Gladly Made 

Thompson 
Electrical Co. 

132 Fayetteville Street 
Phone 370 



Lena Swift: Gosh. Maisie, 
you are small. 

Maisie Smith : Precious arti- 
cles always come in small pack- 
ages. 

Lena Swift: Yes, and so does 
Poison. 



Fire bell rings at 2 a.m. 
First Command in Senior Hall: 
Girls get undressed. 



The Discriminating Saint Mary's Girl 

KNOWS 

"What the well-dressed Woman will Wear" 

THAT 

Not only are taste and quality essential in her attire 
but also variety. We can offer clothes and acces- 
sories at such a price that any girl may have 
quantity, as well as quality, and taste 
in her wardrobe 

Get it at 

GILMER'S 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST STORE 

Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 
Postoffice Box 1270 Phone 305 







Raleigh's Foremost Apparel Shop 
for Women and Misses 

A Store where you are assured of finding throughout the season a pleasing 
assortment of all that is new and worth while in 

WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTER GARMENTS 

\ Store also with the reputation for courteous treatment, good service 
and fair prices 

We respectfully request an inspection of our merchandise and methods 



The Collegiate spirit of youth, grace and buoyancy 
is expressed in every model shown by the College Girls' 
Favorite Shop. 



Very Moderately Priced 
^The Shop ofOriginaJj^pdes 



^ ~ SHOFS.1MC. ■ 



Coals 
Frocks 
Gowns 
Millinery 
Furs. Etc. 



Charlotte, N. C. 
Raleigh. N. C. 
Greenville, S. C. 
Spartanburg. S. C. 



SENIOR WIT 

F. Sans: Hot dog! This is a good book. 
Mopsa: Hot dog! This is a bad one. 

''Hell's tfie place for me" said Miss Turner, as she finished the quota- 
tion from "Aucassin and Nicolette." 



THE BAND BOX 

KATIE SMITH BARBEE 

Phone 2666 

202 Odd Fellows Building Second Floor 



CARLYLE-BARBOUR CO. 



WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 



SHOES AND HOSIERY 



117 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 



Need a Marcel? Permanent? Manicure? Facial? 



GO TO 



Brown 's Beauty Parlor 



ALL THE LATEST BOBS FOR COLLEGE GIRLS 



Expert Service 



Basement Phone 153 

Odd Fellows Building West Hargett Street 



Raleigh, North Carolina 



V. Evans: Miss Thornton, I 
can't get enough words for my 
essay. 

Miss Thornton: Well. Vir- 
ginia, you seem to have over the 
required number. What is your 
bibliography? 

V. Evans: Webster. 



"Take your foot out of my 
face," said Big Ben to Ann as she 
shifted her position on the closet 
floor. 



NOVELTY JEWELRY 
COMPACTS 

New Styles — New Shapes 
New Designs 

$3.00 to $24.00 

Festoon Necks — Indian Bracelets 

Coin Purses — Mesh Bags 

Wrist Watches 

Mahler's 



leuelers for 
68 } ears 



The Gift Shop 
of Raleigh 



"The Choice of a 'Discriminating Public" 

LIKE ALL TRULY FINE THINGS. THE CANNED FOODS 
DISTRIBUTED BY US DEMAND A PLACE OF RESPECT 
IN THE FINEST HOMES. 

IT WILL BE TO YOUR ADVANTAGE TO LEARN TO CALL FOR 

THEM BY NAME 

mili PRATTLOW CANNED FRUITS 

BLOOMSBURY CANNED VEGETABLES 
GELFAND'S MAYONNAISE AND RELISH 




SUCH INTELLIGENCE IN BUYING WILL OF 

NECESSITY DEMAND THE RESPECT 

OF YOUR GROCER 

Geo. Marsh Co., Inc. 

Wholesale Grocers 

310-316 S. Harrington Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Youthful Footwear 



Quality £° ~X\ Style 

$7.00 M/f^ $7.00 



EACH NEW DAY BRINGS A NEW STYLE 

Comet Shoe Company 

Next to California Fruit Store 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 




Raleigh Dress Shop 

L adieus and Misses' 1 Sport JVear 

ART LINENS, REAL LACES 

CHINESE AND JAPANESE GOODS 

NOVELTIES 

Odd Fellows Building — Entrance from Salisbury Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Better Wearing Apparel for Ladies and Misses 


Brotan's 


108 FayeUeviUe Street 


COATS SUITS DRESSES 


SKIRTS WAISTS SWEATERS 


MILLINERY 


"Raleigh's Style Center" 


This U-Drive-It system 


Misses Reese 


Gets lots of advertising 


& Company 


For every time 


FINE MILLINERY 


Two couples go riding 






206 Masonic Temple 


In an automobile 


Second Floor 


Each fellow says 




To the other fellow 


TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT 




To 


U-Drive-It. 


College Girls and Teachers 



PARTY FAVORS GREETING CARDS 

and 

NOVELTIES 

The Blue Lantern Gift Shoppe, Inc. 

109% Fayetteville Street 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Phone 2572 

FREDRIKA STANCILL NITA COLLIER 



"Why does that man have such a bored expression?' 
"He's a wooden Indian." 



A. B. Miller: Oh, listen to that marvelous jazz. 

G. Martin: Why that's a classical number. 

A. B. M.: Well, it sounds good enough to be jazz. 



Eversharp Pencils, Waterman's Fountain Pens, Kodaks and 

Supplies, Albums, Memory Books, Poems 

Loose Leaf Books 



Stationery 
James E. Thiem 



Phone 135 
Raleigh, N. C. 



DELIVERING 
COAL BY WIRE 



Even in this age of miracles, people would hardly credit 
the assertion if they were told that invisible coal and 
water are being delivered by wire. 

Yet that is exactly what this and every other public 
utility in the nation is doing every hour of the day and 
night. 

It requires millions of tons of coal and millions of 

gallons of water to generate the electricity which pro- 
vides light or drives the motors of industry. Invisible 
coal also is transported in pipes when gas is used. 

In hundreds of other ways the utilities invisibly serve 
their customers, cheaper and better than they could 
serve themselves. 



Carolina Power & Light Co. 







Records HJSjjiJw ^^jJBS 


Sheet Music 


■ U^fei 


Bill Bstffr0Q f' 1 -^3 

^tepnenson s 

SONGS SERVICE SATISFACTION 

125 West Martin Street 
Phone 1441 


Exclusive Hat Shop 

Latest Creations in 

Millinery 

DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS 
116Y 2 Fayetteville Street 



The Gift Shop 

Antiques : Novelties : Cards 
Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 



Miss Crofut: Eat your prunes, Polly, they put iron in the blood. 
Polly: But Miss Crofut, I'm too heavy already. 

FIRE! FIRE! 

Fire engine clangs by — 

V. MENZIES (running to the window) : Oh, it's a fire! 

M. Dunlop (excitedly): What's afire? 



Jolly's 

JEWELERS AND 
OPTOMETRISTS 

Since 1881 at 

128 Fayetteville Street 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Our Reputation is Your Guarantee 



SEE 

Herbert 
Rosenthal 

REAL PUMPS 



Swift & Company 

Packers 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



BYNUM PRINTING COMPANY 

Printers . '. Rulers . ". Binders 

Phones 692-3 

Raleigh, North Carolina 





J. J. Fallon 




Company 


El Rose 


FLORISTS 


Beauty Parlor 


Largest Growers of Flowers in 
North Carolina 


B. BASTE, Proprietor 


FLOWERS 




Properly Selected 




Properly Clustered 


Hargett Street 


Properly Presented 


Raleigh, N. C. 


J. J. FALLON 




COMPANY 




203 Fayetteville Street 


Dot Griffith : Everybody in 


The 


school is kidding me about my 


PEACOCK ALLEY 


man. 

L. L. Fray: How come? 


TEA ROOM 


Dot Griffith: I told Jane to 




post a letter for me and she put 
it up on the campus bulletin 
board. 


Caters to Discriminating 
Palates 

"The proof of the pudding is in 




"I hear she had a permanent 


the eating" 


wave." 




'"Yeah, the cost's 'bout to 
breaker." 


121-2 East Hargett Street 




Phone 2592 



WARREN'S TRANSFER 

Opposite Union Station 



Automobiles for Hire 



Special Rates for 

Out-of-Town Trips 



301 West Martin Street 

Phone 538 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



"Raleigh" a Good Shopping Center 
WHERE TO SHOP 

Alfred Williams Company 

Established 1867 

Is the outstanding store for your needs in approved Stationery. 

All the New Books, excellent display of Cards, Novelties. 

We are delighted to have you call. 

119 Fayetteville Street 

EASTMAN KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 




LIVELY AND SNAPPY 

FOOTWEAR 

for 

COLLEGE GIRLS 

Reasonable Prices 

Roscoe Griffin Shoe 
Company 

120 Fayetteville Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning 
and Dyeing Company 

OLDEST AND BEST 

Main Office: 13 S. Wilmington Street 

Cor. Blount and Martin Sts. Plant 414416 Gale St. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



re 

Dunn Brothers 

Distributors 

Raleigh : Wako : Oak City 
Brands of 

FANCY CANNED GOODS 



BRIGHT CHILD 

Alice Dewar was cold creaming 
her face when Mopsa Wilson en- 
ters: "Gosh, look at that map of 
Greece!" 



Miss Monroe: I'm glad to say 
I can give you 70 on this paper. 

Louise Allen: Why don't vou 
make it 90 and be joyful? 



R. 



HIEROGLYPHICS 
L. C. : Silly, what would 



you do if a little bear chased you? 
Silly: I'd run. 
R. L. C: But— oo— o-o— oo— 



W. L. Brogden Company 

WHOLESALE 
FRUITS AND PRODUCE 

223 South Wilmington Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 

An Apple a Day Keeps the Doctor Away 



C. D. Arthur 

Established 1886 

Headquarters for 
SEA FOOD OF ALL KINDS 

Stall No. 1, New City Market 

Terms: Cash 

Phone 255 Raleigh, N. C. 



The 

Corset Shop 

CORSETS 
HOSE 

BRASSIERES 

NOVELTIES 
SILK UNDERGARMENTS 

107 Fayetteville St. 



Dillon Supply Company 


MILL SUPPLIES 


MACHINERY 


Modern Machine Shop 


QUALITY AND SERVICE DID IT 


Phones 752-753 Raleigh, N. C. 


Specify 


• 


SURETY OF PURITY 


Miss Davis: Frances, give a 




sentence with the words "tripping" 




and "conclusion" in it. 


WHITE'S 


Frances Vick: The elephant 
went tripping down the street with 


ICE 


a tin can tied to his conclusion. 


CREAM 







"Next time I meet that darn up- 


"Made in Raleigh" 


pity Captain Kidd I'm going to cut 
him dead," said the pirate as he 


THE BETTER KIND 


sharpened his cutlass. 



DID YOU EVER SEE— 

Eleanor Worth without Margaret Huie? 

Mary Harris without her chink doll? 

Virginia Taylor in a bad humor? 

Olive Jordan talkative? 

Virginia Menzies ugly? 

Polly Parrott unhappy? 

Celeste Hubbard in love? 

The Prince of Wales's picture where it ought to be? 

V. V. Mobley and Marjery Fulenweider without mail? 

A student meeting without a riot? 

"Jonny Muse" unpopular? 

Food without Irma Edmonson? 

Miss Albertson without her beaded bag? 

Miss Ruef without a smile? (Yes, in French N.I 

A Saint Mary's girl who wasn't always "Some kinda hungry"? 

Well — neither have we! 



Hotel Sir Walter 



Carolina's 
Most- 
Modern 
Hotel 
Perfect 
Appointments 




•StSli- 



i j ,s .1 si « t Mit 

" . 



Unsurpassed 

Service 

With Courtesy 

of the 

"Old South'' 



Raleigh, N. C. 



VISIT OUR 

Retail Branch 

120 South Salisbury Street 

For the Best in Fancy Cakes and Pastries of All Kinds 

INSIST ON 

Bread and Cakes 

The Quality Supreme Will Be Found in Our 

BREAD, PIES AND CAKES 

SOLD EVERYWHERE 

Staudt's Bakery 

Established 1896 Raleigh, N. C. 



Hudson-Belk Company 


Raleigh. N. C. 


Department Store 


High Grade 


FEMININE APPAREL 


APPEALING TO THE SMARTEST 


DRESSERS AT A MODERATE COST 


Always a Saving in Our Prices 


WOULDN'T IT BE AWFUL? 




Olzie Rodman says she's scared 
to death that Ash Wednesday will 


Job P. Wyatt 


come on Sunday this year and 


& 


we'll be tricked out of a holiday. 


Sons Company 




NUTTY 
Ella Grey Gauldlng at Hal- 


FIELD AND GARDEN SEED 


lowe'en party) : I've just had the 
longest talk with Mr. Way I've 


Bulbs and Plants 


ever had. 


FARM IMPLEMENTS 


Mary Margaret Willis: What 
did you say? 


AND HARDWARE 


E. G. G. : I said "Have a pea- 
nut. Mr. Way." 


Raleigh, N. C. 



n 


Thos. H. 'Briggs & Sons 


BASKETBALL GOODS, GUNS, AND 


SPORTING GOODS 


A SPECIALTY 


"THE BIG HARDWARE MEN" 


m 




Miss Grant: Why so serious. 


Richmond Meat 


Margaret Ellen? 

Margaret Ellen: I am think- 


Market 


ing. 

Miss Grant: Why do that? 




Margaret Ellen: I must 


L. Schwartz. Manager 


decide which fraternity pin will 




best suit the pink dress Em wear- 


DEALER IN 

CHOICE MEATS 


ing tonight. 


BOOMERANG 


SAUSAGE A SPECIALTY 


Customer: Ah. your steak is 


City Market 


like the weather this eyening. 
butcher, rather tough. 


Raleigh, North Carolina 


Butcher: Indeed? By the 


P. 0. Box 354 


way, your account is like the 
weather too — unsettled. 




— Progressive Grocer. 



AUTOGRAPHS 

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AUTOGRAPHS 

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